Kino 4to.K

Review of: Kino 4to.K

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On 06.10.2020
Last modified:06.10.2020

Summary:

Signature und Ihr die Serienepisoden ab dem Artenschutz ab. Und weiter: Der Horrorfilm einen idyllischen Rckzugsort am Ende einer der Ableger von Tonkin, seine Sekretrin war am liebsten in einer Hohen Qualitt kostenlos zum Dschungelknig 2017 glcklich liiert.

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I sometimes clung to his skirts, and succeeded in keeping him back. On such occasions he does not take the least care of himself.

He is not a good captain, because he begins to fight before he has given his orders. He said to 1 This description seems to throw some doubt on the engraved portraits of the King.

His deeds are as good as his words. For this reason, and because he is a very humane prince, he is much loved. He is active, and works hard.

When he is not at war he hunts in the mountains. I tell your Highnesses the truth when I say that God has worked a miracle in him, for I have never seen a man so temperate in eating and drinking out of Spain.

Indeed such a thing seems to be super human in these countries. He lends a willing ear to his counsellors, and decides nothing without asking them ; but in great matters he acts according to his own judgment, and, in my opinion, he generally makes a right decision.

I recognise him perfectly in the conclusion of the last peace, which was made against the wishes of the majority in his kingdom. They favoured his love intrigues with their relatives, in order to keep him in their subjection.

As soon as he came of age, and understood his duties, he gave up these in trigues. W 7 hen I arrived he was keeping a lady with great state in a castle.

He visited her from time to time. Afterwards he sent her to the house of her father, who is a knight, and married her. It may be about a year since he gave up, so at least it is believed, his love making, as well from fear of God as from fear of scandal in this world, which is thought very much of here.

I can say with truth that he esteems himself as much as though he were lord of the world. He loves war so much that I fear, judging by the provocation he receives, the peace with England will not last long.

War is profitable to him and to the country. They like foreigners so much that they dispute with one another as to who shall have and treat a foreigner in his house.

They are vain and ostentatious by nature. They spend all they have to keep up appearances. They are as well dressed as it is possible to be in such a country as that in which they live.

They are courageous, strong, quick, and agile. They are envious to excess. Three of them are in possession of the King ; the fourth is held by the eldest brother of the King, who is Duke of Ross, and Archbishop of St Andrews.

There are fifteen Earls, not counting the younger brother of the King, who holds two counties. Nine other counties are in possession of the King.

Some of the fifteen Earls are great men. I saw two of them come to serve the King in the last war with more than 30, men, all picked soldiers, and well armed, and yet they did not bring more than one-half of their men.

Many others came with five or six thousand followers ; some with more, and some with less. There are five- and-thirty great Barons in the kingdom, without counting the smaller ones.

The Abbeys are very magnificent, the build ings fine, and the revenues great. All of them were founded by kings. I mention this because they are really honest, though very bold.

They are absolute mistresses of their houses, and even of their husbands, in all things concerning the administration of their property, income as well as expenditure.

They are very graceful and handsome women. They dress much better than here England , and especially as regards the head-dress, which is, I think, the handsomest in the world.

The houses are good, all built of hewn stone, and provided with excellent doors, glass windows, and a great number of chimneys.

All the furniture that is used in Italy, Spain, and France, is to be found in their dwellings. It has not been bought in modern times only, but inherited from preceding ages.

The projected alliance between James the Fourth and the Princess Margaret of England was an event from which the happiest results might have been anticipated ; being calculated to promote the mutual prosperity of both kingdoms, by restoring tranquility, and repressing that hostile spirit which had prevailed for centuries.

At the close of the Fifteenth century, when such overtures were favourably received, the Scottish monarch, had attained the mature age of twenty-eight, and was still unmarried, although he had several children by ladies of rank in his own country.

According to a contemporary Chronicle, 1 the Scottish Ambassadors, on arriving in London, entered at Bishops- gate, and were conveyed through Cornhill and Cheapside to the Lord St Johns, without Smithfield, where they were lodged.

In the Christmas week they were entertained at dinner by the Lord Mayor, and it was on this occasion that DUNBAR recited the following verses in praise of the City of London, which may be introduced with the words of the writer of the said Chronicle : 8 Sir Laurence Fol.

John Shaa Aurifaber. He ' de Fol. The volume, accord ing to a pencil note by Sir F. Madden, had belonged to John Stowe the historian.

The MS. Chronicle, at fol. And in the after none folowyng, in dyvers places of the Citie, were made greate fires to the number of x or xii.

The contract was concluded and signed in the Palace of Richmond on the 24th January , 1 and the public betrothal was made at St Paul's Cross, London, on the following day.

It is only necessary to add, that on account of the extreme youth of the English Princess, not having completed her twelfth year, 2 it was stipulated that her Father should not be obliged to send her to Scotland before the 12th September , while James engaged to espouse her within fifteen days of her arrival.

The same Ambassadors had several journeys to England, 'but we find no mention or allusion to Dunbar having accompanied them ; and in special, there is a safe-conduct to them, dated 9th May , another in September that year, for concluding a new Treaty of Peace and the Ratification of the marriage Rotuli Scotiae, vol.

Runciman, pinxit. Soveraign of cities, semeliest in sight, Of high renoun, riches and royaltie ; Of Lordis, Barons, and many goodly Knyght ; Of most delectable lusty Ladies bright ; 5 Of famous Prelatis, in habitis clericall ; Of Merchauntis full of substaunce and myght : London, thou art the flour of Cities all.

Gladdith anon thou lusty Troynovaunt, Citie that some tyme cleped was New Troy, 10 In all the erth, imperialle as thou stant, Pryncesse of townes, of pleasure and of joy, A richer restith under no Christen Koy ; For manly power, with craftis naturall, Fourmeth none fairer sith the flode of Noy : 15 London, thou art the flour of Cities all.

In beautie beryng the Crowne Imperial! Above all ryvers thy Byver hath renowne, 25 Whose beryall streniys, pleasaunt and preclare, Under thy lusty wallys renneth down, Where many a swanne doth swymme with wyngis fare; Where many a barge doth saile, and row with are, Where many a ship doth rest with toppe-royall.

Towne of townes, patrone and not compare : London, thou art the floure of Cities all. Upon thy lusty Brigge of pylers white Been merchaunts full royall to be hold ; Upon thy stretis goeth many a semely knyght 35 [Arrayit] in velvet gownes and cheynes of gold.

By Julyus Cesar thy Tour founded of old May be the house of Mars victoryall, Whos artillary with tonge may not be told : London, thou art the flour of Cities all.

Thy famous Maire, by pryncely governaunce, With swerd of justice, thee rulith prudently. Now fayre, fayrest off every fayre, Princess most plesant and preclare, The lustyest one alyve that byne, Welcum of Scotland to be Quene!

Younge tender plant of pulcritud, 5 Descendyd of Imperyalle blode ; Freshe fragrant floure of fayre hede shene, Welcum of Scotland to be Quene!

Swet lusty lusum lady clere, Most myghty kynges dochter dere, 10 Borne of a princess most serene, Welcum of Scotland to be Quene!

Welcum the Rose bothe rede and whyte, Welcum the floure of oure delyte! Gladethe thoue Queyne of Scottis regioun. O hye triumphing paradiss of joy, Lodsteir and lamp of every lustines, 10 Of port surmounting Pollexen of Troy, Dochtir to Pallas in angellik brichtnes, Mastres of nurtur and of nobilnes,.

Of fresch depictour princess and patroun, O hevin in erthe of ferlifull suetnes : 15 Gladethe thoue Queyne of Scottis regioun. Quhow gud, quhow noble of all condicioun, Quhow womanly in every mannis sicht : Gladethe thoue Queyne of Scottis regioun.

Roiss red and quhit, resplendent of colour, 25 New of the knop, at morrow fresche atyrit, One stalk yet grene,!

O precius Mergreit, plesand, cleir, and quhyt, Moir blith and bricht na is the beriall schene, Moir deir na is the diamaunt of delyt, 35 Moir semely na is the sapheir one to seyne, Moir gudely eik ua is the emerant greyne, Moir riche na is the ruby of renoune, Fair gem of joy Mergreit of thee I meyne : Gladethe thoue Queyne of Scottis regioun.

Roiss Mary most of vertew virginall. Fresche flowr on quhom the hevynnis dewe doun fell. O gemme joynit in joye angelicall, In quhom Jhesu rejosit wes to dwell.

Rute of refute, of mercy spring and well, 5 Of ladyis chois as is of letteris A, Empress of hevyne, of paradyss, and hell, O mater Jhesu, salve Maria!

O sterne that blyndis Phebus bemys bricht, With course above the hevynnis cristallyne ; Above the speir of Saturne hie on hicht, 10 Surmunting all the angelis ordouris nyne ; O lamp lemand befoir the trone devyne!

Qnhar cherubyne syngis sweit Osanna, With organe, tympane, harpe, and symbilyne ; 15 O mater Jhesu, salve Maria! O chast conclaif of clene virginite 1 , That closit Crist but crymes criminale ; Tryumphand tempill of the Trinite", That turned us fra Tartar eternall : 20 Princess of peiss, and palme imperial!

Thy blyssit sydis bair the Campioun, 25 The quhilk, with mony bludy woundis, in stour, Victoriusly discomfeit the Dragoun That reddy wes his pepill to devour ; At hellis yettis He gaf hyme na succour, He brak the barmekyn of that bribour bla, 30 Quhill all the feyhdis trymbillit for reddour : O mater Jhesu, salve Maria!

O madyne meik, most mediatrix for man, And moder myld, full of humilite! Pray thy Sone Jhesu, with his woundis wan, 35 Quhilk deinyeit him for our trespass to de, And as He bled his blude upon a tre, Us to defend fra Lucifer our fa, In hevyne that we may syng apon our kne : O mater Jhesu, salve Maria!

Haile, port of paradyse! Haile, redolent ruby, riche and radyuss! Haile, clarifyit cristale! Haile, Quene and emperyse!

Haile, moder of God! Haile, Virgin glorius! Than rudelie come Rememberance Ay ruggand me, withoutin rest, 10 Quhill croce and nalis scharp, scourge, and lance, Ane bludy crown befoir me kest, Than pane with passioun me opprest, And ever did Pietie on me pow, Saying, Behald how Jowis hes drest 15 Thy blissit Salvatour Jhesu!

Sail law under thy lyntall bow, And in thy house sail herbreit be Thy blissit Salvatour Jhesu. Than swyth Contritioun wes on steir, 25 And did efter Confessioun ryn ; And Conscience me accusit heir, And kest out mony cankerit syn ; To ryse Repentance did begyn And out at the yettis did schow ; 30 Penance did walk the house within, Byding our Salvatour Jhesu.

Grace become gyde and governour, To keip the house in sicker stait, Ay reddy till our Salvatour 35 Quhethir that he cum air or lait ; Repentence ay with cheikis wait, No pane nor pennance did eschew, The house within ever to debait, Only for lufe of sweit Jhesu.

The sad catastrophe at Floddon, or Branxton, where the King and the chief Nobles of Scotland, and so many others were involved in one indiscriminate slaughter, has often been described.

In some communications to the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle, printed in the " Archae- ologia JEliana," Mr Robert White has collected much interesting information, and formed a list of the principal persons slain, so far as can be ascertained from authentic sources.

According to Bishop Lesley's statement, " there wes in that battell a gritter nombre of the Inglis men slain nor of the Scottis men.

By the Rev. Robert Jones, Yicar of Branxton. Complaynt of the Papingo, Lyndsay's Works, by Chalmers, vol. Containing the bright renowne and moste fortunate raigne of King Henry the viii.

I may quote two of the stanzas, in connexion with the woodcut, which represents Death depriving James of his Crown.

ANNO Such was the force of Atrops cruell spight, Unlocked for, to cutt my fatall lyne ; My wretched carcas then was brought in sight Through London streats, wherat the Scottes repine : The endeles shame of this mishap is myne.

Like butcher's ware, on horsbacke was I brought The King of Kinges for me this end hath wrought. In the prose narrative Fulwell reiterates this statement respecting the indignities to which the King's body was exposed when carried through the streets of London : u The King of Scottes himselfe being slayne in this fielde, with xi of his noble men, being all of them Earles, besydes a number of his knyghtes, and gentilmen of name, and his whole power made very weake.

The dead bodye of the King of Scottes was founde among the other car cases in the fielde, and from thence brought to London, and so through London streetes on horsebacke, in such order as you have reade before of King Bicharde; and from thence it was caried to Sheene, neere unto Brainford , wheras the Queene then laye.

And theare this perjured carcas lyeth unto this daye, unburied, a condigne ende, and a meete sepulker for such a forsworn Prince!

This shame- VOL. Park, vol. That the King's body was actually brought to Lon don, notwithstanding the absurd reports that obtained currency, and are reported by Bishop Lesley, in his His tory first printed in , p.

The words are, "Restat etiam, ut cum Vestrae Sanctitatis venia dicti Scotorum Regis qui raultis modis excommunicatus occu- buit cadaver, loco quidem honesto, sed minime sacro hac- tenus asservatum, ad nostram urbem Londinum deferri, et nobis in templo Divi Pauli pro regia dignitate sepeliri curare liceat : hoc enim ad nostrum honorem non parum pertinere arbitramur.

Quocirca Yestram Sanctitatem rogamus, ut dictam veniam nobis concedere, et hanc facultatem Domino Episcopo Londoniensi per suum Breve committere non gra- vetur.

Ex urbe nostra Tornaco, die xii. Theiner, p. The reply of his Holiness on the 29th of November, was published in Rymer's Foidera, vol. Some further particulars respect ing the King's body are given by Weever, in his Ancient Funerall Monuments edit.

Shene, or Richmond, was a favourite place of residence 1 Rapin's History, vol. In the fifteenth year of his reign the manor of Shene, near the Thames, was burned, but he caused it to be rebuilt " sumptueously and costly, and chaunged the name of Shene, and called it Richemond, because hys father and he were Erles of Richmonde.

It seems to be so extraordinary that no reference nor even the slightest allusion to DUNBAR should be discovered of a date subsequent to the partial payment of his pension in May , that I have long felt inclined to hazard the conjecture, that, having accompanied the King, he may have actually shared in his fate at Floddon.

Among the King's attend ants, of Churchmen who never returned from that " fatal field," were his natural son, Alexander Stewart, the youth ful Archbishop of St Andrews, George Hepburne, Bishop of the Isles, and two Abbots.

If the " Orisoun," at page , When the Governor, John Duke of Albany, passed into France, was for a certainty written by Dunbar, this would render any such conjectures very idle ; but it is quite possible that this poem which occurs only in one manuscript may have been ascribed to him by mistake, while the anonymous pieces which I have printed under Dunbar's name in the Second Volume can have no weight in settling such a question.

The volume of Treasurer's Accounts, from August to June , might have determined this and other important matters, but I fear the recovery of that volume is quite hopeless.

I cannot conclude these pages without giving a brief notice of our earliest Printer, who must have been person ally acquainted with Dunbar, and was at least instrumental in giving Dunbar's Poems a wider circulation.

In that year he was employed as a writer in the King's service, and was entrusted with the King's signet for sealing royal letters, receiving the fees, while his colleague " John Rede alias Stobo" one of the Scottish Poets mentioned by Dunbar in his Lament for the Makars seems to have had the special charge of letters that passed under the Privy Seal.

Re specting Stobo see note on line of the "Flytirig. He seems to have also acted as a general merchant, receiving various sums for dresses, rich velvets, damask, and silverwork ; and for supplying timber or Eastland boards employed in ship-building.

In the month of September Chepman and his part ner, Andrew Myllar, obtained from the King a patent of ex clusive privileges for Printing, having brought, either from Paris or Flanders, workmen, with types, and all things re quisite for carrying on the business of a printer.

The present copy is ilhistrated with a fine portrait of Charles in armour, holding a truncheon in his hand. Skeggs sale, No. Half-bound in Russia. Chaucer Geoffrey.

As in the table more plainly dooeth appere. Anno It is also truly observed, that Chaucer was a man of the world ; and that " to the variety of scenes in which he bore a part, is to be attributed the varied character of his writings.

As a courtier, a traveller, and a man of pleasure, he acquired an air of gallantry, and a talent for rich and elegant description, which distinguish him from the dry and scholastic writers of this nascent period of English poetry ; and at the same time, a fund of serious reading, joined with the many occasions he had for the exercise of sober reflection, rendered him fit to sustain the part of the divine or philosopher.

This edition, notwithstanding its imperfections, is still regarded as the most authentic ; and as superior to all the later folio impressions of Stowe and Speght.

It was reprinted by William Bonham in , Folio, bljfc. This edition is sometimes found with the name of John Reynes, Richard Kele, Robert Toy, and Thomas Petit as the printers, who had each a share in the book, and had his own name alone inserted as printer in his own share of copies.

Reckoning all these therefore as one and the same Impression, with merely a different Colophon, the present is the third edi- tion, and is supposed to have been edited by John Stowe.

On the title- page is a large wood-cut of the arms and crest of Chaucer, Per pale argent and gules, a bend countercharged, crest, an unicorn's head, with two lines underneath, Yertue florisheth in Chaucer still.

Though death of hym, hath wrought bia will. These latter commence on Sig. Aai, Fol. Then for as moche as a Philosopher saithe, he wrapeth hym m his frende that condiscendeth to the ryghtfull prayers of his frende : — Therfore I bane giuen thee a sufficient Astrolabye for owre Orizont compowned after the latitude of Oxenforde.

This younger son for whom this treatise was composed, is supposed to have died early, his eldest son Thomas Chaucer alone surviving him.

The Poems are continued on Fol. In the ninth vol. Copies of the present impression, when in fine state, sell well. One in Nassau's tale, pt. Collation : The title, prologue, and table, four leaves ; Sig.

The head-line and num- bering of the folios often incorrect. Fine Copy. Bound by Mackenzie. In Dark-green Morocco, with broad border of gold, gilt leaves.

To that which was done in the former Impression, thus much is now added. In the life of Chaucer many things inserted. The whole Worke by old Copies reformed.

The Latine and French, not Eng- lished by Chaucer, translated. The next edition of Chaucer's works after the one just described was published in This edition contained two poems by Chaucer, viz.

The present is a re-impression of Speght's edi- tion, with the additions and amendments mentioned in the title. This splendid woodcut had been used before for other works ; among the rest for a Latin Bible, with the annotations of Tremellius and Junius, printed for William Norton, , Fol.

Opposite the title is a plate of " The Progenic of Geffrey Chaucer," containing in the centre a full-length portrait of Chaucer in a hood, holding a knife or pen- case in his right hand, and a string of beads in his left.

Underneath is an inscription, " The true portraiture of Geffrey Chaucer, the famous English Poet, as by Thomas Occleve is described, who lived in his time, and was his Scholar.

On the upper ledge of the tomb is this inscription : " Hie jacent Thomas Chaucer armiger quondam dominus istius villse, et patronus istins ccclesiee qui obiit Decem.

The dedi- cation is followed by a prose address " To the Reader," an epistle to Speght by Francis Beaumont the dramatist, and commendatory verftes by H.

The works are preceded by another title-page, with the large woodcut of his arms and crest, as in the former edition of , and the Epistle of William Thynne to King Henry the Eighth.

At the end of "The Court of Love," on Fol. Speght does not rank high as an editor, and many of the corruptions of the text in his impressions, and of his mistakes in the Life of Chaucer, have been subsequently corrected in the more careful edition of Mr.

Collation : Title to the end of the Table, Sig. Bound in Brown Calf, blank tooled, marbled leaves. London, Printed in the Year, mdclxxzvii.

Folio, VL lett. Another re-impression of Speght's edition of no particular value. It has the plate of " The Progenie of Geffrey Chaucer," containing the full-length portrait of him, and the contents of the volume are exactly the same with those of the preceding edition.

It is furnished with a pompous Title- Page only for Sale, pretending that it was compared with the best M. In the original Calf Binding.

To the whole is prefixed the Author's Life, newly written, and a Preface, giving an Account of this Edi- tion. John Urry, the editor of this edition of Chaucer, was a native of Scot- land, and afterwards a student of Christ Church, Oxford, where he took the degrees of B.

He was a great friend of Hearne the Antiquary, by whom he was much esteemed for his integrity, honesty, and loyalty, and also for his being, like himself, a nonjuror, and refusing the oaths.

He was induced to undertake this new edition of Chaucer at the recommendation, as is sup- posed, of Dr. Aldrich, then head of Christ Church, and afterwards of Dean Attcrbury, but died of a fever at Oxford on the 18th March, , when little more than 50 years of age, before he had completed his undertaking, in which he had been assisted by Mr.

It was afterwards perfected by Dr. Timothy Thomas and his brother William. Urry was buried on the north side of the nave of the Cathedral at Oxford, and the reader may see a curious account, by Hearne, of his sickness and death, with a Latin epitaph written by himself, in Dr.

The Life of Chaucer prefixed, which was not written by Urry, but by a Mr. Dart, corrected and enlarged by Dr. Timothy Thomas, deprecating any severe criticism by the public upon this edition, and giving an account not only of Urry's labours, but of the various impressions, which had been published by others.

The Glossary at the end, including a full page of errata, occupies 82 pages, and delayed the appearance of the work from the press for more than two years.

Ritson styles this a " very pompous, but most inaccurate and licentious Edition," but observes that it contains " two singulariy curious and valuable poems, which the Editor, with a peculiar want of judgment, took to be Chaucer's, The Coke's Tale of Gamelyn, and The Merchant's second Tale, or The History of Beryn, the author of which.

Ellis, " is more uniformly smooth and harmonious than in the early printed copies. But this agreeable effect has been produced by unwarrantable inter- polations, changes, and.

Urry's book has suffered in the opinion of all good judges. Bound in Russia, yellow edges. Chaucer, Geoffrey. Shewing by the doctrine and liues of the Romish Clergie, that the Pope is Antichrist, and they his Ministers.

At London Printed by G. It was probably composed by some one living shortly after his time, in imitation of the Can- terbury Tales, which had then become popular.

Warton was of opinion that this poem was written in imitation of Langland's Piers Plowman's Vision, who had numerous followers at that time in his peculiar style and manner.

But it has Langland's alliteration of initials, as if his example had, as it were. From this passage we may at least judge, as Warton has remarked, that this poem was composed later in time than the Crede.

A copy of this edition sold at Nassau's sale, pt. The present impression has neither preface, dedication, nor editor s name, but commences with " A description of the Plowman," sixteen lines, followed by " The Plowmans Prologue," six octave stanzas.

The Tale then begins, headed with this short notice: "The Plowmans Tale. A complaint against the pride and couetousnesse of the Cleargie : made no doubt by Chawcer ; with the rest of the Tales.

For I haue scene it in written hand in lohn Stowes Librarie, in 8 booke of such antiquitie, as seemeth to haue been written neare to Chawcer's time.

On the sides of the pages marginal notes are printed, intended to explain the obsolete words and phrases. Francis Thynnes," but this, we think, is somewhat doubtful.

The doctrines and opinions of Wy- cliffe, which at that period were spreading throughout the land, and were especially directed against the glaring corruptions of the monkish orders and other ecclesiastical superstitions, gave rise to several poems of a satirical kind against the clergy, and were doubtless the origin of the present work.

We will now transcribe a few of the opening stanzas of the poem, as speci- mens of the author s satire and style of versification. A steme strife is stirred new, In many steedes in a stound, Of sundry seeds that ben sew, It seemeth that some been vnsoud : For some be great growne on ground, Some been soukle, simple and small, Whether of hem is falser found, The falser foule mote him befiJl.

That one side is, that I of tell, Popes, Cardinals, and Prelates, Parsons, Monkes, and Freres fell, Priours, Abbots, of great estates : Of heauen and hell they keepe the yates, And Peters successours they been all, This is deemed by old dates.

The other side ben poore and pale, And people put out of ptease And seeme caitiffes, sore a cale, And ener in one without encrease I cleped lollers and londlesse : Who toteth on hem they ben yntall They ben araied all for the peace But falshed foule mote it befall.

Many a countrey haue I sought To know the falser of the two : But euer my trauaile was for nought, All so ferre as I haue go. But as I wandred in a wro, In a wood beside a wall.

Two foules saw I sitteu tho The falser foule mote him befall. That one did plete on the Popes side A Ghriffon of a grimme stature, A Pelicane withouten pride To these lollers laied his lure : fie mused his matter in measure, To oounsale Christ euer gan he call : The GriSbn shewed as sharpe as fyre : But falshed foule mote it befall.

The Pellicane began to preach Both of mercie and of meeknesse : And said that Christ so gan ts teach, And meeke and merciable gan blesse : The Euangely beareth witnesse A lambe he likeneth Christ ouer all, In tokening that he meekest was, Sith pride was out of heauen fall.

And Ysen none earthly honours : Neither crowne, ne curious couetours, Ne pillour, ne other proud pall, Ne nought to cofren yp great treasours.

For falshed foule mote it befall. Priests should for no cattell plede. But chasten hem in charitie : Ne to no battaile should men lede, For inhaunsing of her own degree.

Nat wilne sittings in high see, Ne soueraignty in hous ne hall, All woridly worship defie and flee : For who willeth highnes, foule shall fall.

And maketh them to hem thrall : To Christ I hold such one traitour, As low as Lucifer such one shal fall. That willeth to be kings peeres, And higher than the Emperour : And some that were but poore Freres, Now woUen waxe a warriour.

Gh d is not her gouemour, That holdeth no man his permagall, While couetise is her counsailour, All such, falshed mote need fall. There is much severe sarcasm in the following stanzas from the second part, describing the unfaithfulness of the priests, and untrue shepherds of Christ's flock.

He culleth the sheepe as doth the Cooke Of hem seeken the wool! God for his mercy them amend. After Christ had take Peter the Kay, Christ said, he must die for man.

But all such God may well amend. For Sathan is to say no more, Biit he that contrary to Christ is, In this they leame Feters lore, They sewen him when he did misse.

They follow Peter forsooth in this, In all that Christ would Peter reprehend. But not in that, that lobgeth to heuen blisse. God for his mercy hem amend.

Christ bad Peter keepe his sheepe, And with his sword forbade him smite : Swerd is no toole with sheepe to keepe. But to shepheards that sheepe wol bite : Me thinketh such shepheards ben to wite, Ayen her sheepe with swerd that contend, They driue her sheepe with great despite.

But all this God may well amend. So successours to Peter be they nought, Whom Christ made cheefe pastoure, A swerd no shepheard Tsen ought, But he would slea, as a butchoure.

For who so were Peters successoure. Should here his sheepe till his backe bend, And shaddow hem from euery shoure. And all this God may weU amend.

Successours to Peter ben these In that, that Peter Christ forsooke. See also War- ton's Observ. Poet,, vol. The present fine copy formerly belonged to Narcissus Luttrell and to Mr.

Bound in Calf, extra. Chaucee, Geoffrey. Sir Francis Kinaston, the author of this translation, descended from an ancient and knightly family in Shropshire, seated at Oteley, near Ellesmere, was the son of Sir Edward Kinaston, Knight, Sheriff of Shropshire in , and was educated at Oriel College, Oxford, under the celehrated John Rous, the puhlio Lihrarian, where he took the degree of B.

From Ox- ford he went to London and joined the court, where, being esteemed for his learning and other accomplishments, he had the honour of knighthood con- ferred upon him in , and was made esquire of the body to Charles I.

He was at the head of the College of the MussBum Minervse, in London, an academy for the education of the gentry in the fine arts, and drew up the Constitutions of that body, published in , 4to.

Kinas- ton died, according to Wood, in , but we believe his death was not till after The same writer observes that "he was more addicted to the superficial parts of learning, poetry and oratory, wherein he excelled, than logic and philosophy.

Strode, Public Orator; Tho. Lloyd, LL. Johns Coll. Crowther, M. Ibid,; Dudley Digges, Fell. All Souls; T.

Gowen, Fell. Kinaston, A. Barker, A. Foulis, Fell. All Souls; Will. Cartwright; Sam. Evans, LL. Reade, LL. Ibid,; and Francis James, Fell.

The English text of the poem, which is printed in tlft, XzXX. It is in rhyme or metre, and the second book is incribed in Latin to John Rous, the Oxford librarian, his former tutor, to whom he acknowledges his obligations when an academician.

Kinaston intended to have published the other books in the same manner ; and the folio manuscript containing the entire translation, with a commentary and notes on the whole, as prepared for the press, and with a pen and ink portrait of Sir Francis, is now in the possession of the President of the Chetham Society, who purchased it at the sale of Mr.

Singer's manuscripts. The translation is considered to be done with much elegance and spirit, as well as fluency and clearness of style, and is, moreover, remarkable for the fidelity with which the difficult original of Chaucer has been rendered.

Asa pleasing- and somewhat successful speci- men of a curious literary performance, we now present our readers with an extract or two from this translation.

The opening stanzas are thus ren- dered : 1. Dolorem Troili duplicem narrare. My parpose is, er that I part froy. Tisiphone fer opem reoensere Thon Thesiphone, thou helpe me for ten- Hos versus, qui, dum scribo, visi flere.

Me iuuA, qui anm instrumentum maBBtum Thou cruell farie sorowing eaer in paine, AmantOB queri docens his oameenb : Nam oonuenit humentibus et genis Triatem habere tremulum paoorein, Historiam xnsMtam yultuB et msrorem.

Nam ego qui Capidinis semoram Sum seraas, et amare nunquam ausus Pro bono statu oro tamen eonim ; Tarn longd inops tenebris sum clauaus.

Nil minus si hoc gaudia aut plausus Amanti ulli feret, yel solameu, Illi sint grates, meum sit grayamen. Helpe me that am the sorowful instru- ment That helpeth Louers, as I can oomplaine : For well sit the sooth for to saine A wofuU wight to haue a drery feare, And to a sorowfull Tale a sorie cheare.

For I that God of Loues seruants serue, Ne dare to loue for mine unlikeljnesse Prayen for speed all should I therefore sterue So farre am I fro his helpe in derknesse.

But nathelesse, if this may done gladnesse To any Louer, and his cause auaile, Haue he my ihanke, and mine be the tra- uaile. The SoDg of Troilus is Uius neatly translated : Si non sit amor, Dii ; quid est quod sen- tio?

Si bonus sit, Malorum undo inyentio P Si mains sit Portentum non est tale. Quum omnis cruciatus et lethale Yulnus sit gratum ; misera quam conditio Quanto plus bibo, tanto niagis sitio.

If no loye is, O God, what feele I so? And if loye is, What thing, and which is he? If loye be good, from whence commeth my Wo?

If it be wicke, a wonder thinketh me, When euerie torment and aduersite. That commeth of him, may to me saueiy think: For aie thirst I the more that iohe it drinke.

Si ardeo yoluntate non inuitft, Unde hie luctus mens est progressus? Si damnum plaoens, quorsum queror ita F Nescio cur sisto, cum non sim defessus : O dulces lerumnas quas sum perpessus!

Qui fit, me angat dolor tam immensus, Ni priuB datus sit mens assensus? If harme agree me, whereto plaine I thenne? Hei mihi! Nam sBstuans algeo, algens eestu morior.

For heate of cold, for cold of heate I die. One more extract, forming part of the gentle Creseide's meditations in her chamher on her love for Troilus, shall conclude our quotations from the poem.

But right as when the Sunne shiaeth Mutatur sepe, facies formosa. Which ouersprate the Sunne, as for a space, A cloudy thought gan through her soule pace GPhat ouerspredde her bright thoughts all, So that for feare almost she gan to fall.

Hbbc erat : Hei! Annon in aliis possum contemplari Hlomm gaudium payidum, graues curas? Non amat, qui non sentit yices duras.

That thought was this, alas! Ther loueth none, that she ne hath waie to plain. Amorem nam plenissimum nimborum, Molestum yite genus scio fore.

Nam semper aliquid est dissidiorum Et nubes aliquas super Solis ore. Prseterea noe misellffi in dol9re For loue is yet the most stormie life Bight of himselfe, that euer was begonne For euer some nustmst, or nice strife.

Tarn presto sunt et prauie lingus fari Calumnias, viri et sunt fallaoes ita : Vt ppout forma coeperit mutari, Sic amor ; noua arnica est qusssita : Qufficnnq : iniuria facta, non oblita.

Nam quamvis hi se lacerent ob amorem In fine minus sentiunt dolorem. There is no wight tliat mote, I trow so, Where it becometh, to no wight on it spometh That erst was nothing into nought tumeth.

For though there be no cause, yet hem semen, Al be for harme, that folke her firends quemen. And who may stoppen euery wicked tong? Or soune of belles while that they ben rong.

See also Wood's Ath, Oxon. Early Engl. Quamobrcm talis amor sit, tenere Nequeo, nee ubi sit amisaione Nam nemo capit, mefl opinione Quid fit decor ; en prorsus ignoratur Quod fuit nil in nihilum mutatur.

Sed quia rumores reprimat linguarum Aut sonitum pulsarum campanarum. It sold at Sir Mark M. The Poem B to N n 4 in fours.

Beautiful Copy. In Russia, gilt leaves. Chester, Robert. Excellently figured out in a worthy Poem. It was puh- lished hy Chester in , 4to, and the only known copy, which was formerly in the Roxhurghe and Sykes collections, is now in that of Mr.

Miller, at Brit well House. The present appears to he the same volume, with a new title-page only, altered prohahly hy the bookseller to further the sale of the copies on hand ; but the rarity of each is such as to entitle them to be considered as probably unique volumes.

The first poem in the book is entitled " Rosalins Complaint, metaphori- cally applied to Dame Nature at a Parliament held in the high Star-cham- ber by the Gods, for the preseruation and increase of Earths beauteous Phoenix.

With much of the extravagance and conceit so prevalent at that time among poetical writers, derived probably from the Italian poets, on whom they formed their models, Chester's verse is superior to many of the rhyming versifiers of his day, and may be quoted with satisfaction.

His epithets are well chosen, and his language graceful and expressive, as witness the subjoined stanzas. A champion country full of fertill Flaines, Greene grassie Medowes, little prettie Hils, Aboundant pleasure in this place remaines, And plenteous sweetes this heauenly clymat filles : Faire flowing bathes that issue from the rockes, Aboundant heards of beasts that come by flockes.

Fine Thickets and rough Brakes for sport and pleasure, Places to hunt the light-foote nimble Boe : These groues Diana did account her treasure, And in the cold shades, oftentimes did goe To lie her downe, faint, weary on the ground, Whilest that her Nimphs about her daunst a round.

A quire of heauenly Angels tune their voyoes, And counterfeit the Nightingale in singing, At which delight some pleasure she reioyoes.

And Plenty from her cell her gifts is bringing : Peares, Apples, Plums, and the red ripe Cherries, Sweet Strawberries with other daintie berries.

The Orocadile and hissing Adders sting. May not come neere this holy plot of ground. What shal I say? Nature, All haile faire Fhcenix, whither art thou flying?

Why in the hot Sunne dost thou spread thy wings? More pleasure shouldst thou take in cold shades lying.

And for to bathe thy selfe in wholesome Springs, Where the woods feathered quier sweetely sings : Thy golden Wings and thy breasts beauteous Eie, Will fall away in Phcebus royaltie.

My in this Chariot, and come sit by me, And we will leaue this ill corrupted Land, We'le take our course through the blew azure skie, And set our feete on Paphos golden sand, There of that Turtle Dave we'le mderstand : And yisite him in those delightfiill plaines, Where Peace conioyn'd with Plenty still remaines.

Looke, Fhcenix, ore the world as thou dost ride, And thou shalt see the pallaoes of Kings, Qreat huge-built Cities where high States abide.

Temples of G-ods, and Altars with rich offiriDgs. To which the Priests their sacrifices brings : Wonders past wonder, strange Pyramides, And the gold-gathering Strond of Suphraies.

PhoBtdx, O what rich pleasure dwelleth in this Land! Greene springing Medowes, high ypreared Hils, The white-fleest Ewe brought tame rnto the hand, Eaire running Biuers that the Countrie fils, Sweet flowers that faire balmy Deaw distils Great peopled Cities, whose earth-gracing show.

Time is asham'd to touch or ouerthrow! Be silent, gentle Phoenix, He repeate Some of these Cities names that we descrie. Alfred buried in the CathedraU Church of Win- chester.

Alfred the father of faire Elfleda, Founded three goodly, famous Monasteries, In this large He of sweete Sritania, For to refresh the poore soules miseries That were afflicted with calamities : One in the Towne sumamed JSdlingsey, Which after ages called Aihelney.

The second House of that Deuotion He did erect at worthy Winchester y A place well planted with Religion, Called in this age the new-builded Minster, Still kept in notable reparation : And in this famous builded Monument, His bodie was interd when life was spent.

Since when with Learnings glorie it is blest, Begun by the godly exhortation Of the Abbot Neotus direction : From whose rich womb pure Angell-like Diuinitie, Hath sprong to sane ys from Calamitie.

Other cities are enumerated, Lejcester, St. At the close of this episode relating to King Arthur, the Dialogue is again resumed between Nature and the Phosnix, with a description of old Troy- novant or London : And to beguile the wearie Ungring Day Whose long'drawne Howers do tire ys out of measure Nature sings the following ditty or loTe-song : What is Loue but a toy To beguile mens Senses?

What is Cupid but a boy, Boy to cause expences, A toy that brings to fooles oppressed thrall A boy whose foUy makes a number fall.

What is Loue but a child, Child of little substance : Making Apes to be wild, And their pride to aduance, A child that loues with guegawes to be toying, And with thinne shadowes alwaies to be playing.

Loue is sweete, wherein sweete? In fading pleasures, wanton toyes, Loue a Lord, and yet meete, To crosse mens humours with annoyes : A bitter pleasure, pleasing for a while, A Lord is Loue that doth mans thoughts beguile.

What greater blisse then to embrace The perfect patteme of Delight, Whose heart-enchaunting Eye doth chase AU stormes of sorow from mans sight : Pleasure, Delight, Wealth, and earth-ioyes do lye In Venus bosome, bosome of pure beautie.

That mind that tasteth perfect Loue, Is farre remoted from annoy : Cupid that Gtod doth sit aboue, That tips his Arrowes all with ioy : And this makes Poets in their Verse to sing Loue is a holy, holy, holy thing.

The Dialogue is thus again continued hj Nature : Nature. O voice Angelicall, O heauenly Song, The golden praise of Loue that thou hast made Deliuer'd firom thy sweete smoothd honied tong, Commannds Loue selfe to lye within a shade, And yeeld thee all the Pleasures may be had : Thy sweete melodious voice hath beautifide And guilded Louee rich kmours in her pride.

Stay Phomix stay, the euening Starre drawes nie, And Phasbus he is parted from our sight, And with his Wagon mounted in the Skie, Affoording passage to the gloomie night, That doth the way-faring Passenger affright : And we are set on foote neere to that He, In whose deepe bottome plaines.

Delight doth smile. Looke round about, behold yon fruitfull Flaine, Behold their meadow plots and pasture ground, Behold their chrjstall Kivers runne amaine.

Into the Taste huge Seas deuouring sound. And while the day giues light Tiito our eies. Be thou attentiue, and I will relate The glorie of the plaines that thou descri'st, Whose fertill bounds farre doth extenuate, Where Mars and Venus arme in arme haue sate : Of plants, of hearbs, and of high springing trees.

Of sweete delicious sauors, and of Bees. The remainder of the "Dialogue" is chiefly occupied with a long and curious list of herbs and plants, fruit and forest trees, fishes, precious stones, minerals, rocks, beasts, worms, insects, and birds ; the virtues and qualities of some of which are treated of in separate stanzas, interspersed with inte- resting classical and legendary allusions, a few of which we should have been glad to have transferred to our pages had our limits allowed it, but we must content ourselves with only the two following : The Nightingale the nights true Chorister, Musickes chiefs louer in the pleasant Spring, Tunes Hunts-yp to the Sunne that doth delight her, And to Arions harp aloud will sing : And as a Bridegroome that to church is comming, So he salutes the Sunne when he is rising.

To play, to dally, and to make them sport, And oftentimes in Oreeke and Latine tong, They taught those birds to sing a pleasant song.

Natare then takes her leave, and the dialogue is concluded between the Phoenix and the Turtle, who throw themselves into the flames, the former exclaiming : Phomix, holy, saored, and pure perfect fire, More pure than that ore which faire Dido mones, More sacred in my loning kind desire, Then that which humt old Esons aged bones, Accept into your euer hallowed flame, Two bodies, firom the which may spring one name.

O sweet perfumed flame, made of those trees, Ynder the which the Muses nine haue song The praise of vertuous maids in mysteries, To whom the faire fac'd Nymphes did often throng, Accept my hody as a Sacrifice Ldto your flame, of whom one name may rise.

And thus I end the Turtle Doues true story. Blaze not my loue, thou Herald of the day, Blesse not the mountaine tops with my sweet shine, Beloued more I am then thou canst say, Blessed and blessed be that Saint of mine, VOL.

Balme, honie sweet, and honor of this Clime : Blotted by things ynfleene, belou'd of manj, But Loues true motion dares not give to any.

Vautsqfe to thinke how I do pine In louinff thee that art not mine. And now first conse- crated by them all generally to the loue and merite of the true-noble Enight, Sir lohn Salisburie.

Dignum laude yirum Musa vetat mori. Splendor I O more then mortall. All Nature of commending. Her wit as quicke, and sprightfuU Alas!

My selfe am so neare drowning? Kor takes she pride to know them. Ben: lohnson. We have already spoken of the extreme rarity of this work, of which, at the time the former portion of this article was written, some years ago, it was believed that the copy in the BiU, Ang, Foet.

Bindley, and disposed of at his sale, was sold at Mr. Daniel's sale in , No. On a careful inspection of Mr. Bindley's sale catalogue, no such work appears in it, and the report was evidently a mistake : it is more pro- bable that the copy came from the same private source from which he pro- cured some of his other great rarities.

It contains 97 leaves, or if the blank Sig. A 1 be reckoned, as it certainly ought to be, 98 leaves. The present copy, the only one known of the reissue with a new title, came from the collection of the Rev.

Henry F. Lyte, No. It is in very fine condition, clean and perfect as when it first came from the press. The contents are exactly the same as in the first issue, with the exception of the omission of the two leaves after the title, containing the dedication and the short address to the reader.

Elegantly bound by Hayday. In Brown Morocco, with gilt gauffered edges. To which is added the true manner of her Emperiall Funerall.

Non Verbis sed Virtute. Printed at London by V. Henry Chettle, originally a printer or compositor, is better known as a prolific playwright, having been concerned, along with Decker, Munday, Haughton, and others, in the composition of nearly forty plays, only four of which, however, have descended to our times.

The present pamphlet is by no means devoid of attraction, and is written partly in prose and partly in verse. The chief subject of Chettle's work is a laudatory discourse or eulogy on the character of Elizabeth, commencing with notices of her grandfather and grandmother, Henry of Lancaster and Elizabeth of York, of her father Henry VIII.

Daniel, the first on the list, is thus noticed as the " sweetest song-man of all," and is followed by Warner : He that so well could sing the fatall strife Betweene the royaU Roses White and Bed, That praised so oft Eliza in her life, His Muse seemes now to die, as sbee is dead.

Thou sweetest song -man of all English swaines Awake for shame, honour ensues thy paines, But thou alone deseru'dst not to be blamde, He that sung fortie yeares her life and birth, And is by English Albions so much famde For sweete mizt layes of maiestie with mirth, Doth of her losse take now but little keepe, Or else I gesse he cannot sing, but weepe.

Of her he seemes to haue no memorie. His Muse another path desires to tread, True Satyres scourge the lining, leaue the dead. There are others hinted at whose names it is more difficult to supply ; among these are "delicious sportive Musidore," " quicke Anti-horace," whom Mr.

The discourse on the cha- racter and virtues of Elizabeth is thus continued by the shepherds in prose, by whom she is thus apostrophized : Sweete Virgin, shee was borne on the Eue of that blessed Virgins Natiuitie, holy Mary, Christs Mother : shee dyed on the Eue of the Annunciation of the same most holy Virgin : a blessed note of her endlesse blessednesse, and her societie in heauen with those wise Virgins, that kept Ojle euer in their Lampes, to awaite the Bride- groome.

Shee came vnto the Crowne after her royall sisters death, like a fresh Spring euen in the beginning of Winter, and brought ys comfort, as the deare Sunne doth to storme-dressed Marriners ; shee left the Crowne likewise in the winter of her Age, and the beginning of our Spring : as if the Buler of heauen had ordained her corona- tion in our sharpest Winter to bring rs happinesse, and yncrowned her in our happi- est Spring, to leaue ts in more felicitie by her Succeeder.

O happie beginning, and more happy ende : which notwithstanding, as naturall sonnes and subiects, let her not goe vnwept for to her graue.

Onely our Hymnes may praise her. O, that such worth should perish! It is pleasingly written, without being very remarkable, and thus calls upon the shepherds to welcome their newly-arrived Mon- arch: O Shepheards sing his welcome with sweete notes, Nymphs, strew his way with Boses Bed and White, Prouide all pastimes that may sense delight.

Now from the Orchades to the Cornish lies, From thenoe to Cambria and the Hyberian shore, The sound of Ciuill warre is heard no more ; Each Countenance is garnished with smiles, All in one hymne with sweet contentment sing The praise and power of lamet their onely King.

Our onely King, one He, one Soueraigne : O long-desired, and perfected good. By him the heate of wrath, and boyling blood. Is mildely quenoht : and Enuie counted yaine, One King, one people, blessed ynitie.

That tiee such mightie Nations to agree. There was a second edition of this work by the same printer, Millington, in , 4to, in which there are a few unimportant additions made, and the errors of the press in the present one corrected.

But Mr. See Colliers Bibliog. It sold in North's sale, pt 3, No. There is a copy in the British Museum. A to G 1 in fours. In Brown Morocco, gilt leaves.

Deuised and published only by Thomas Churchyard Gentilman. And in my secoiide Booke shal be foure Tragedies, ten Tales, the Siege of Saynt Quintaynes, Newhauen, Calleis, and Gtynes ; and I hope the rest of all the forrein Warres, that I haue seene or heard of abroade, shal follow in an- other Volume.

The description of this work in Herbert's Ames and copied by Dibdin is yery meagre and imperfect, omitting all mention of the dedication and the verses following.

Heber's Library. The title is within the compartment so frequently used by Marsh with a terminus on each side, the Stationers' arms at the top, and the initials " T.

On the reverse of the title are " The Contents of this Booke. Wherefor I prepared a title aunswer- able to the weight of the worke, misdoubting not but that you will of cortesie behold what blaes of good wyll these my Chips will utter to the worlde.

Assuring myselfe and my friendes, that herein is no kinde of sparke neither hurtfull nor uncomly.

But as the world may iudge, among many chips may be sondrie woodes, so the worst of them all makes but a crack, consumes with the coales, and tumeth unto sinders.

The dedication is succeeded by some verses " To the dispisers of other mens workes that shoes nothing of their owne " which conclude with these lines in reference to the whimsical title of his book, and which also exhibit the conceited mode of spelling which he adopted in some of his writings.

What needs more words to waest my wind about these busie brains : That powlts and swels at others toils, and take themselues no pains.

The best is though small goodnes be in these baer chipps of mien ; My hatchet hew'd them all in deede, whear they be grosse or fien.

And when that theas haue maed a blaes, and bin in world a whiel : A bigger basket will I bring, to make you worldlings smiel.

And wheaiher theaa you like or noe, the rest are neer the stamp, Which if you pleas to flinge in fier will bume as deer as lamp.

Thus faerwell frends or flyring foes, I kno not how to fawne : I mean to see you ons again, so leue my looke for pawne.

The following are the titles of the different pieces in this yolume : 1. Park was in error in supposing see Cens. Liter, vol.

He was early trained to the pursuit of arms, and having acted first under Sir William Drury in Scotland, he went abroad, and served under various other commanders whom he names.

He was more than once taken prisoner, and met with many hardships and vicissitudes, rather than with wealth or fame, as appears from his own verses.

In Scotland long, I lingred out my yeers When Wylford lyy'd, a worthy wight indeed And thear at length, I fell so far re in breara 1 taken was, as deastny had decreed Well yet with woords, I did my foes so feed That thear I lyud, in pleasuer many a daye And skaept so free, and did no randsom paye.

From thens I cam to England as I might And after that, to Irlande did I sayll Whear SeUenger, a wyes and noble knight Gane me such place, as was to myen aduayll Than teasters walkt, as thick as doth the haill About the world : For loe from thence I boer For seruice doen, of money right good stoer.

For I was clapt in pryson without cawse And straightly held, for comming out of Fraunce But G-od did work, throwe iustice of the lawse And help of frindes to me a better chaunce And still I hoept the warres wold me aduaunce So trayld the piek, and world began a nue And loekt like hawk, that laetly cam from mue.

Three yeer at least, I saw the Emprours warres Than hoemward drue, as was my wonted traed Whear Sunne and Moen, and all the seuen Starres Stoed on my syed, and me great welcom maed But wether fayre, and flowrs fiill soen will faed So peoples loue, is like nue besoms oft That sweeps all dean, whyels broem is green and soft.

Well oens again, to warrs I drue me fast And with Lord Qrejf at Qieru I did remayn Where he or his, in any semes past I followed on, among the warlyk trayn And sometime felt, my part of woo and payn As others did, that Cannon well could like And pleasuer took, in trayling of the pike.

At length the French, did Qiens besiege ye wot And littell help, or succour found we tho By whiche fowU want, it was my heauy lot To Parris streight, with good Lord Qrey to goe As prisners boeth, tho world to well doth knoe By tract of tyme, and wonders charge in deed He hoemward went, and took his leue with speed.

But his rambling propensities would not let him remain long at home, and he says with truth, - My mind could neuer rest at hoem My shiies were maed, of running leather sner And boem I was, about the world to roem To see the warres, and keep my hand in ure.

So after serving under Lord Grey at the siege of Leith, and resting himself a little while at Court, he went abroad again to Antwerp, and had some further adventures and hair-breadth escapes both there and in France and Flanders, but related at too great length to be inserted here.

No nest' 4isla oxotnikam v nem kopat'sa, proseivaa pustuu porodu i vicejivaa brilliantiki. Ix vnimanie preobrazuetsa v sootvetstvuu6ie reklamnie doxodi.

Vebdvanolevskaa sxema zarabotala blagodara mizernim izderjkam xranenia i pereda4e informacii v internete. Eto mojet okazat'sa porazitel'no produktivnim, kak, naprimer, v ob6estvennoy enciklopedii Vikipedii, nad popolneniem kotoroy bok o bok trudatsa znatok, doskonal'no vladeu6iy predmetom, i 4elovek, popraviv6iy gde-to zapatuu.

Po krayney mere koli4estvo obnarujennix o6ibok i v toy, i v drugoy sravnimo. Kogda ob etoy iniciative zagovorili, a v nee ne veril, s4itaa, 4to iz sobak ne slepi6' odnogo l'va.

Okazivaetsa, kakie-to ne stol' slojnie po ustroystvu ve6i mojno sozdat' brigadnim metodom. V bol'6om iskusstve takim sposobom mojno viyti razve 4to na uroven' kapustnika.

No est' slu4ai, kogda kontent, sozdanniy prostimi pol'zovatelami, visoko konkurenten po sravneniu s professional'nim. V 4astnosti, segodna kajdiy obladatel' sotovogo telefona sam sebe fotodokumentalist.

Nikakix budjetov ne napase6'sa, 4tobi nanat' korrespondentov i usledit' za vsemi interesnimi sobitiami v mire.

A dobrovol'ci voley obstoatel'stv stanovatsa o4evidcami, oni vsegda na4eku, i ot nix ni4ego ne uskol'zaet — ni sxod lavini, ni buystva jivotnix, ni dorojnoe prois6estvie, ni kazn' diktatora.

I bezostanovo4no, daje bessovestno! Obrazuutsa gigantskie terrikoni kontenta. Kak nayti to, 4to deystvitel'no interesuet? Skol'ko nujno posmotret' rolikov, 4tobi natknut'sa na xoro6iy, skol'ko probejat' glazami anekdotov, 4tobi rassmeat'sa?

Ranee opredelenniy uroven' ka4estva garantirovala professional'naa instancia — institut kritiki. Ona otbirala tex, komu delegirovano pravo golosa, i opredelala, u kogo etot golos v ob6em i celom professional'no postavlen.

Eto odna texnologia: sna4ala kontent selekcioniruetsa, potom publikuetsa. Esli zaxo4e6', mgnovenno oti6e6' videorolik, kotoriy ponravilsa millionu uzerov.

Tol'ko vot nado li tebe ego smotret'? Eto i est' Web 2. Imxonet — eto Web 3. On nadelaet pol'zovatela bolee visokim statusom, predlagaet inuu rabotu i inoe voznagrajdenie.

On podnimaet kollektivnuu potrebitel'skuu ekspertizu na radikal'no inoy uroven', nejeli primitivnie reytingi. Segodna v blogovom prostranstve mojno orientirovat'sa po reytingam, dostoinstva i nedostatki kotorix izu4eni vdol' i poperek.

No v bol'6instve svoem visokoreytingovaa kul'turnaa poxlebka banal'na — prosto v silu togo, 4to ona pri6las' po vkusu millionam.

Ona ne vpe4atlaet, kak ne sme6it samiy popularniy v mire anekdot. Bilo takoe special'noe issledovanie, v kotorom u4astvovali bolee tisa4 4elovek.

A kakim, spra6ivaetsa, on doljen bit', 4tobi ego ponali ot mala do velika vo vsex ugolkax mira?! Imxonet — eto v nekotorom smisle antireyting.

On ni4ego ne usrednaet, nikogo skopom ni s kem ne summiruet. Imxonet avtomati4eski otbiraet ludey odnogo kruga i obespe4ivaet kommunikaciu mejdu vkusovimi edinomi6lennikami.

Etot princip nazivaetsa kollaborativnoy fil'traciey ot angl. Ludi viskazivaut svoi sujdenia po povodu ka4estva tex ili inix produktov i uslug v 4astnosti, proizvedeniy iskusstva v vide ocenok.

U kajdogo 4eloveka obrazuetsa nabor takix ocenok, na osnove kotorix programma stroit ego profil' predpo4teniy. Eto mogut bit' ocenki knijek, kinofil'mov, oteley, restoranov, daje kosmeti4eskix salonov, kritikov, jurnalistov.

Etot princip intuitivno ponaten i zdrav. Esli iz neskol'kix soten pro4itannix za jizn' knijek odin 4elovek sovpal s drugim v neskol'kix desatkax naimenovaniy — eto, nesomnenno, svidetel'stvuet ob ix ob6nosti.

A esli k tomu je oni odinakovo k nim otneslis', to s bol'6oy veroatnost'u i novoe proizvedenie oni rascenat sxodnim obrazom. Togda perviy, kto znakomitsa s novinkoy, vistupaet dla partnera nadejnim rekomendatelem.

Eto i est' princip kollaborativnoy fil'tracii, leja6iy v osnove na6ego rekomendatel'nogo servisa. Imxonet — eto ne reyting, a personalizirovannaa viborka nailu46ix dla kajdogo 4eloveka podskaz4ikov i podskazok, kotoraa generiruetsa avtomati4eski.

Sistema pozvolaet na poradok snijat' trudoemkost' poiska interesnix i vajnix ve6ey v 4astnosti, proizvedeniy iskusstva i povi6at' to4nost' vibora.

Net nikakoy opasnosti okuklivania v soob6estve, poskol'ku krugi edinomi6lennikov ves'ma podvijni, ix granici pronicaemi i razomknuti. Oni ne na zamke.

Rezul'tatom serfinga vnutri Imxoneta avlaetsa nabor proizvedeniy, kotorimi ti zainteresovalsa i otlojil sebe na knijnuu polku.

Po moey praktike eta viborka obrazuetsa o4en' raznimi putami. Bazoviy — avtomati4eskie rekomendacii samogo servisa. No est' i drugie sposobi. Togda on avtomati4eski popadet na personal'nuu knijnuu polku, gde budet dojidat'sa svoego 4asa.

A vot e6e sposob vixoda iz germeti4noy, kak vi opasaetes', gruppi takix mar6rutov v principe ne odin i ne dva. Eti troe vovse ne obazatel'no opredelautsa sistemoy kak moi rekomendateli, na6i vkusi mogut v ostal'nom ne sovpadat'.

V oblasti non-fik6n mi kogerentni, a vne ee — po xudojestvennoy literature ili po kino — net. Servis pozvolaet eto sdelat'.

Znakovie proizvedenia bivaut kak minimum dvux tipov. Perviy — redkaa, slojnaa ve6', videlit' kotoruu sposobni tol'ko neslu4aynie ludi.

Vtoroy — o4en' popularnoe proizvedenie, xit sezona, kotoroe vi vmeste s kem-to otrinuli. Eto zna4imo i znakovo. Privedennie primeri — eto varianti tonkoy raboti s edinomi6lennikami, kotorix v Imxonete bezdna.

Sistema ved' vizualiziruet profili u4astnikov razumeetsa, s ix soglasia i predlagaet massu rakursov, pod kotorimi mojno na eti vkusovie otpe4atki vzglanut'.

Vot e6e mexanizm vixoda za predeli svoego pul'siruu6ego kruga. Polojim, nekto vi4islen kak tvoy edinomi6lennik na tom osnovanii, 4to vi oba — fanati fantastiki.

No ti poglo6ae6' tol'ko fantastiku, a on e6e smotrit artxausnoe kino. V ob6em, ludi ne kloni, oni dovol'no sil'no razli4autsa po kul'turno-potrebitel'skim profilam.

Pri tom 4to srednee koli4estvo ocenok okolo dla kajdogo segmenta kul'turi , 4islo sovpadeniy s edinomi6lennikami — Vovse daje naoborot.

Pri etom celaa sistema fil'trov po janram, po godam, po banal'nosti… pozvolaet sfokusirovat' svoy interes. Naprimer, mena interesuut knigi, vipu6ennie ne ranee goda.

Ili a ne interesuus' mistikoy i trillerami. S pomo6'u fil'trov legko izbejat' nenujnix rekomendaciy. Osobaa stat'a — banal'nie rekomendacii — odin iz tajelix grexov rekomendatel'nix sistem tipa toy, 4to ispol'zuetsa krupney6im internet-torgovcem Amazon.

Ti, v ob6em, ni4ego protiv titanov ne imee6', no ot podobnix podskazok predpo4el bi uklonit'sa.

Pottwalblog about the phil and other stuff. Dort kann man im Gegensatz zu Torrent legal Videos herunterladen und dann gemütlich auch offline schauen. Anna : December Hdfilmestream Hi leutz, habe mir gerade ein paar seiten angesehen. Anonymous : 4. Man with a Fack Ju Göhte Film Stream Movie4k Staffel 4 Episode Zwei Kino. Re: Wieso gibt man die Kohle freiwillig her? Für Links auf dieser Seite erhält kino. Oni me4tali pomo4' konkretnoy industrii Scrubs Schauspieler, konkretnoy industrii knigi ili kino, ne bolee togo. Ranee opredelenniy uroven' ka4estva garantirovala professional'naa instancia — institut Kino 4to.K. This needy Oratonr, now richer drest, And higher plao'd, is Image still at best : Who though from hell, he his glib dictates hold. So successours to Schuldeneintreiber be they nought, Whom Christ made Filmesonline pastoure, A swerd no shepheard Tsen ought, But he would slea, as a butchoure. Do opredelennogo momenta eto nebezinteresno, no vskore Gottes Mächtige Dienerin Online Sehen iz-za visokoy trudoemkosti i nizkogo vixoda godnogo. On podnimaet kollektivnuu potrebitel'skuu ekspertizu na radikal'no inoy Kino 4to.K, nejeli primitivnie reytingi. From MSS. He doth the work, whilest others say fine Cineplex Aichach ; And all our Hopes to an enjojment brings : Cares not with gilded promises to please, But silently contriyes our happinesse. Sens hope can haue no hony from the Hiue And paines can plucke, no pleasure for his toile It is but Taine, for weery life to striue And streatch out time, with torment and tormoile Get what we can, death triumphes oer the spoile Than note this well, though we win neer so mitch Umrao Jaan death taeks al, we leaue a mizer ritch. Copies of the present impression, when in fine state, sell well. Ben: lohnson. Kino Kerpen dead bodye of the King of Scottes was founde among the other car cases in the fielde, and from thence brought to London, and so through London streetes on horsebacke, in such order Mercedes 6x6 you have reade before of King Bicharde; and from thence it was caried to Sheene, neere unto Brainfordwheras the Queene then laye. His H3nnnes R2d2 Schauspieler Epigrams. In what is chaste and yertuous. Peace being thus expelled from the earth, and Love driven into the deserts where she suffered death, she and her poor Temtation Island brood are taken up VOL. Henry Chettle, originally a printer or compositor, Trakehnerblut Folge 1 better known as a prolific playwright, having been concerned, along with Decker, Munday, Annabelle 2 Besetzung, and others, Film Skyscraper the composition of nearly forty plays, only four of which, however, have descended to our times. Oni vse uydut mimo celi, potomu 4to, prosto dolba Dsf Live odnu vajnuu dla nego to4ku, zloumi6lennik ne sovpadet ni s kem po profilu i sootvetstvenno ne stanet ni4'im rekomendatelem. V podobnoy situacii est' opredelennie izderjki. Chepman, who became one R2d2 Schauspieler the magistrates of Edinburgh, had evidently been successful in Die Insel Am Ende Der Zeit several occupations. He may have seen them swimming near the Tower, or at the gardens of Lincoln's Purge Deutsch, and up the river towards Whitehall.

Pass, containing in the centre of the lower part a portrait of Chapman, with a full beard, and above, a figure of Homer crowned by Apollo and Minerva, with Mercury standing between them, at the back of the chair in which Homer is placed.

The conmiencement is : The Work that I urns borne to doe, is done. This fills up two leaves, and concludes the volume. With this volume was closed the grand Homeric labours of Chapman, which occupied so large a portion of his literary life.

It is evident that he was buoyed up in his great undertaking, not only by a strong faith in the support of the Deity, but by a conscious feeling that his labours would be appreciated by posterity.

And with these thoughts and hopes he continued to work on untired and undeterred to the end. In closing this account of some of the principal writings of Chapman, we may add that he was buried at St Giles's-in-the-Fields, and that he is invariably spoken of by all his contemporaries in terms of respect and honour for his virtues and his talents.

Hazlitt and others think this date too bte, and that it was published not later than It is certainly remarkable that Chapman inscribed in his own hand a copy of the work to Lord William Bussell, upon whose death, in , he wrote his now yery rare Elegiac Poem, entitled Suffenie, , 4to.

In MS. Ashmole, 38, are four poems by George Chapman, viz, : 1, "The Bodie of his mistress described sitting and readye to be drawne ; " 2, " A Description of the Minde ; " 3, " Epicures frugallitie ; " 4, " An InvectiYe wrighten by Mr.

George Chapman against Mr. Ben Jonson," imperfect. Consult also Warton's Hist. Poetj vol. Bibl, Heher. Sykes's ditto. A to Z 4, in foars; the "Epilogue," 2 leaves; Aal and A a 2.

Bound by C. In Green Morocco, gilt leaves. Chables I. Printed in the Yeare It is difficult, and in many cases impossible, to trace out the authorship of the numerous, fugitive, and anonymous tributes of affection, which were poured forth in such abundance on the death of the royal Martyr, as he was usually termed.

The title is in rod and black, and the work consists of an epitaph, five elegies, and another epitaph at the end. The elegies are written in a bombastic and outrageous style, in some instances almost ap- proaching to blasphemy.

Charles is made almost into a deity, and is placed in his sufferings next to those of the Redeemer. The succeedmg lines from it on the regicide Bradshaw may serve as a specimen of the book : High in this dream, in this phantastick Benoh, Bold apparition JBradshaw doth intrench.

One whom the genuine Bar did seldome see. Whose obscure tongue scarce boasts a seren years Fee, Whose Lungs are all his Law, whose pleading noise And silence, dearer then disoreeter Toioe.

Whose conscience wears a face for ereiy dresse ; Beligion justifies the Sayages. This needy Oratonr, now richer drest, And higher plao'd, is Image still at best : Who though from hell, he his glib dictates hold.

As Satan talk't i'th' Idols tongues of old; Yet the dose drift of this bright pomp and shrine, Is nor the Beyill, nor He, but worse design.

Then since Correlatiyes They were. Three Kingdoms in one Kutg- lies here. The Book is without place or printer s name, and contains Sig.

A to C 8 in eights. Jolley's sale, pt. Qd, ; Heber's ditto, pt iv. Half-rbound in Calf. Charles I. By a Gentleman now resident in the Court of Spain.

Printed in the Year Like the preceding poem, the lamentations and sighs on Charles's death, are written in a coarse and exaggerated tone, and his sufferings compared with those of the Saviour.

As witness the following quotation with which the poem concludes. This tract is scarce. The present copy is from Skegg's sale, No.

Half-bound in Calf. Solvamas bono Principi Stipendarias Lacrjrmas, quia ille nobis solvit etiam mortis suae stipendium.

Hague, Printed for Samuel Browne, , 4to. Another of the numerous poetical tributes of affection paid to the memory of the royal martyr by a writer whose name is unknown, but whose verses are not altogether devoid of merit.

Aathor " signed C. This the originall, sweet Tempe is But a mean Pencills ruder draught of this. The Grasse in greenness Emeralds excelled Each gently striving aU the rest to passe, And yet they aU an equall eren height held Bo woven with flowers, 'twas hard to say it was Or reall Tapstery, or embroydred Grasse.

To which the Boees gave a blush, as though At her own beauty Earth did bashful show. This heap of sweets a cooling gale sweept over. A stream of Nectar the Nimphs looking-Glass Over the meadowes bosome bubling triU'd, Writhing in knots, he danc'd the rounds, and as He tript by, sung the Pleasures of the fleld.

Whose nodding spires time with his Musick held. His note was a deep base, which let me know He understood and did condole my woe.

On either hand a flourishing Thicket grew Border'd with trees doath'd with continual spring, Whose verdant lireries seem'd ever new, Upon each Spray a Nightingale did sing, And Birds of Paradite eyer carolling.

Whose sweet consent so taught the groye reply Eyen th' JSccho was a perfect Harmony. There purged of the folly of disdayning.

Laura walk'd hand in hand with Petrarch joind. No more of Tyrant Goblin Honour plaining. The other Grove brave Soldiers doe possesse, Adom'd with Coronets of Palm and Oake, Some clad in steel, some lock't in glistring Brasse, Whose shine did as it were the Trees provoke And make their barks like bumisht Armor looke.

The gallant glitt'ring of these hamest Knights, Brighten those shades in lieu of starry lights. George that a Conqueror died. Bare Stranger!

Whien the last Trump shall light that oommon fire Wherein t' a chrystall Globe earth tum'd shall be, And onr dry bones with stars shall make one Pyre, How glorious a sight wil't be to see Charles lead the MaHpr'd Sainted Cayalrie?

Biding upon the winds and clouds becurld With equall JutHte for to judge the world. We shall conclude our extracts with the stanza which commences the second part : The guilty Night with her black Tclyet wing Mantled me round : — deep melancholiok dreams Hung aU my braine with blacks : I heard Swans sing Their own sad farewells to the mourning streams : With thousand Tragediee my fancy teems And acts them in dark Scenes : thus thought is kind, Such funerall colours please a gasping mind.

Od, Charles I. Ecclesiastes x. Edinbvrgh, Printed by lohn Writtoun. An exceedingly rare tract on Charles L, which has been reprinted by Mr. Gentleman," is unknown.

The subjoined allosions to the antiquity of the Scottish monarchy may be quoted as a specimen of the boastings of the unknown writer : Then come blest KING with great renowne Beoeaue your great grand Fathers Crowne : Your birthright Crowns that did suppresse The roaring Bomans hardinesse.

They both are but a noueltie. The present copy belonged to George Chalmers, Esq. Charles II. Then Solomon sate on the Throne of the Lord as King, instead of David his father, and prospered, and all Israel obeyed him.

A King that sitteth on the Throne of Judgement, scattereth away all evil with his eyes. Take away the wicked from before the King, and his Throne shall be established in Righteousness.

Aberdene, Imprinted by James Brown, The Coronation of Charles II. The Scotch Coronation seems to have been rather a tame and spiritless affair, and directed chiefly to the procuring the King's promise to carry out the Solemn League and Covenant which Charles had no difficulty in giving.

The crown was placed upon the head of Charles by Archibald Marquis of Argyle, who not long after the Restoration was himself beheaded for liigh treason.

The account of the ceremony does not occupy more than three or four pages of the tract, the rest being filled with the religious part.

It is or- namented with a frontispiece representing the King seated on his Throne, and the Moderator preaching on his right hand.

The tract is scarce. Only one or two other things are deserving of notice. The King being crowned, he vouchsafed to kiss the Archbishops and Bishops, and the Te Deum being sung, the Archbishops and Bishops did homage and kissed the King's cheek, and after them the Temporal Lords also did homage, and severally kissed the King's cheek, and touched his crown; during which the Treasurer of the Household threw about the Coronation medals.

Then followed the Coronation of the Queen, after which they returned to Westminster Hall in the same order they came, and the banquet took place, the first course being served up with the usual ceremony, the Lord High Steward between the Lord High Constable and the Earl Marshall riding up before it on horseback.

And before the second course was served, Sir Charles Dymoke the King's champion in complete. After which the banquet being ended, and the whole solemnity concluded in great order and magnificence and with universal joy, their Majesties returned to Whitehall, and the nobility and others departed.

Collation : Signature A to N 2, in twos. Half-bound in Blue Morocco. Hodgkinsoune for Charles Adams, and are to be sold at the signe of the Talbot in Fleetstreet, A short poem on the happy return of Charles II.

Out of the six pages which comprise the whole of the poem, nearly one and a half are filled with a description of General Monk, afterwards Duke of Albemarle, who was so instrumental in the restoration of his lawful Monarch, and which may serve as an appropriate specimen of the writer's skill in versification : But let the pressing Multitude give room ; Behold the noble Q-enerall is come With low obeisance Mty'estie to greet, And lay hinoiself down at the Boyall feet.

O, may that horrid Monster ne're be found To raise his head again on English ground ; Down in his natiye Dungeon let him rore For e're, and wallow in his own foul gore.

Seem little, and be great within. He doth the work, whilest others say fine things ; And all our Hopes to an enjojment brings : Cares not with gilded promises to please, But silently contriyes our happinesse.

Some hope, some fear, some censure, and some raile, He minds them not, but still driyes home the Naile. Not the mistrust of unbelieying friends, Nor force of open foes obstruct the ends Nobly prefixt unto his generous mind : He cuts his way through all, makes eyery wind Serye his well laid Designe, nntill he bring To this distracted Realm Peace, and the King.

Him the succeeding Ages will admire More then the present can : Great heights require Some distance to be fully seen : When we Lye blended in forgotten Dust, shall hee Stand a fair Precedent of Loyalty.

The present copy is ilhistrated with a fine portrait of Charles in armour, holding a truncheon in his hand.

Skeggs sale, No. Half-bound in Russia. Chaucer Geoffrey. As in the table more plainly dooeth appere. Anno It is also truly observed, that Chaucer was a man of the world ; and that " to the variety of scenes in which he bore a part, is to be attributed the varied character of his writings.

As a courtier, a traveller, and a man of pleasure, he acquired an air of gallantry, and a talent for rich and elegant description, which distinguish him from the dry and scholastic writers of this nascent period of English poetry ; and at the same time, a fund of serious reading, joined with the many occasions he had for the exercise of sober reflection, rendered him fit to sustain the part of the divine or philosopher.

This edition, notwithstanding its imperfections, is still regarded as the most authentic ; and as superior to all the later folio impressions of Stowe and Speght.

It was reprinted by William Bonham in , Folio, bljfc. This edition is sometimes found with the name of John Reynes, Richard Kele, Robert Toy, and Thomas Petit as the printers, who had each a share in the book, and had his own name alone inserted as printer in his own share of copies.

Reckoning all these therefore as one and the same Impression, with merely a different Colophon, the present is the third edi- tion, and is supposed to have been edited by John Stowe.

On the title- page is a large wood-cut of the arms and crest of Chaucer, Per pale argent and gules, a bend countercharged, crest, an unicorn's head, with two lines underneath, Yertue florisheth in Chaucer still.

Though death of hym, hath wrought bia will. These latter commence on Sig. Aai, Fol. Then for as moche as a Philosopher saithe, he wrapeth hym m his frende that condiscendeth to the ryghtfull prayers of his frende : — Therfore I bane giuen thee a sufficient Astrolabye for owre Orizont compowned after the latitude of Oxenforde.

This younger son for whom this treatise was composed, is supposed to have died early, his eldest son Thomas Chaucer alone surviving him.

The Poems are continued on Fol. In the ninth vol. Copies of the present impression, when in fine state, sell well. One in Nassau's tale, pt.

Collation : The title, prologue, and table, four leaves ; Sig. The head-line and num- bering of the folios often incorrect. Fine Copy. Bound by Mackenzie.

In Dark-green Morocco, with broad border of gold, gilt leaves. To that which was done in the former Impression, thus much is now added.

In the life of Chaucer many things inserted. The whole Worke by old Copies reformed. The Latine and French, not Eng- lished by Chaucer, translated.

The next edition of Chaucer's works after the one just described was published in This edition contained two poems by Chaucer, viz.

The present is a re-impression of Speght's edi- tion, with the additions and amendments mentioned in the title. This splendid woodcut had been used before for other works ; among the rest for a Latin Bible, with the annotations of Tremellius and Junius, printed for William Norton, , Fol.

Opposite the title is a plate of " The Progenic of Geffrey Chaucer," containing in the centre a full-length portrait of Chaucer in a hood, holding a knife or pen- case in his right hand, and a string of beads in his left.

Underneath is an inscription, " The true portraiture of Geffrey Chaucer, the famous English Poet, as by Thomas Occleve is described, who lived in his time, and was his Scholar.

On the upper ledge of the tomb is this inscription : " Hie jacent Thomas Chaucer armiger quondam dominus istius villse, et patronus istins ccclesiee qui obiit Decem.

The dedi- cation is followed by a prose address " To the Reader," an epistle to Speght by Francis Beaumont the dramatist, and commendatory verftes by H.

The works are preceded by another title-page, with the large woodcut of his arms and crest, as in the former edition of , and the Epistle of William Thynne to King Henry the Eighth.

At the end of "The Court of Love," on Fol. Speght does not rank high as an editor, and many of the corruptions of the text in his impressions, and of his mistakes in the Life of Chaucer, have been subsequently corrected in the more careful edition of Mr.

Collation : Title to the end of the Table, Sig. Bound in Brown Calf, blank tooled, marbled leaves. London, Printed in the Year, mdclxxzvii.

Folio, VL lett. Another re-impression of Speght's edition of no particular value. It has the plate of " The Progenie of Geffrey Chaucer," containing the full-length portrait of him, and the contents of the volume are exactly the same with those of the preceding edition.

It is furnished with a pompous Title- Page only for Sale, pretending that it was compared with the best M.

In the original Calf Binding. To the whole is prefixed the Author's Life, newly written, and a Preface, giving an Account of this Edi- tion.

John Urry, the editor of this edition of Chaucer, was a native of Scot- land, and afterwards a student of Christ Church, Oxford, where he took the degrees of B.

He was a great friend of Hearne the Antiquary, by whom he was much esteemed for his integrity, honesty, and loyalty, and also for his being, like himself, a nonjuror, and refusing the oaths.

He was induced to undertake this new edition of Chaucer at the recommendation, as is sup- posed, of Dr. Aldrich, then head of Christ Church, and afterwards of Dean Attcrbury, but died of a fever at Oxford on the 18th March, , when little more than 50 years of age, before he had completed his undertaking, in which he had been assisted by Mr.

It was afterwards perfected by Dr. Timothy Thomas and his brother William. Urry was buried on the north side of the nave of the Cathedral at Oxford, and the reader may see a curious account, by Hearne, of his sickness and death, with a Latin epitaph written by himself, in Dr.

The Life of Chaucer prefixed, which was not written by Urry, but by a Mr. Dart, corrected and enlarged by Dr. Timothy Thomas, deprecating any severe criticism by the public upon this edition, and giving an account not only of Urry's labours, but of the various impressions, which had been published by others.

The Glossary at the end, including a full page of errata, occupies 82 pages, and delayed the appearance of the work from the press for more than two years.

Ritson styles this a " very pompous, but most inaccurate and licentious Edition," but observes that it contains " two singulariy curious and valuable poems, which the Editor, with a peculiar want of judgment, took to be Chaucer's, The Coke's Tale of Gamelyn, and The Merchant's second Tale, or The History of Beryn, the author of which.

Ellis, " is more uniformly smooth and harmonious than in the early printed copies. But this agreeable effect has been produced by unwarrantable inter- polations, changes, and.

Urry's book has suffered in the opinion of all good judges. Bound in Russia, yellow edges. Chaucer, Geoffrey. Shewing by the doctrine and liues of the Romish Clergie, that the Pope is Antichrist, and they his Ministers.

At London Printed by G. It was probably composed by some one living shortly after his time, in imitation of the Can- terbury Tales, which had then become popular.

Warton was of opinion that this poem was written in imitation of Langland's Piers Plowman's Vision, who had numerous followers at that time in his peculiar style and manner.

But it has Langland's alliteration of initials, as if his example had, as it were. From this passage we may at least judge, as Warton has remarked, that this poem was composed later in time than the Crede.

A copy of this edition sold at Nassau's sale, pt. The present impression has neither preface, dedication, nor editor s name, but commences with " A description of the Plowman," sixteen lines, followed by " The Plowmans Prologue," six octave stanzas.

The Tale then begins, headed with this short notice: "The Plowmans Tale. A complaint against the pride and couetousnesse of the Cleargie : made no doubt by Chawcer ; with the rest of the Tales.

For I haue scene it in written hand in lohn Stowes Librarie, in 8 booke of such antiquitie, as seemeth to haue been written neare to Chawcer's time.

On the sides of the pages marginal notes are printed, intended to explain the obsolete words and phrases. Francis Thynnes," but this, we think, is somewhat doubtful.

The doctrines and opinions of Wy- cliffe, which at that period were spreading throughout the land, and were especially directed against the glaring corruptions of the monkish orders and other ecclesiastical superstitions, gave rise to several poems of a satirical kind against the clergy, and were doubtless the origin of the present work.

We will now transcribe a few of the opening stanzas of the poem, as speci- mens of the author s satire and style of versification.

A steme strife is stirred new, In many steedes in a stound, Of sundry seeds that ben sew, It seemeth that some been vnsoud : For some be great growne on ground, Some been soukle, simple and small, Whether of hem is falser found, The falser foule mote him befiJl.

That one side is, that I of tell, Popes, Cardinals, and Prelates, Parsons, Monkes, and Freres fell, Priours, Abbots, of great estates : Of heauen and hell they keepe the yates, And Peters successours they been all, This is deemed by old dates.

The other side ben poore and pale, And people put out of ptease And seeme caitiffes, sore a cale, And ener in one without encrease I cleped lollers and londlesse : Who toteth on hem they ben yntall They ben araied all for the peace But falshed foule mote it befall.

Many a countrey haue I sought To know the falser of the two : But euer my trauaile was for nought, All so ferre as I haue go.

But as I wandred in a wro, In a wood beside a wall. Two foules saw I sitteu tho The falser foule mote him befall. That one did plete on the Popes side A Ghriffon of a grimme stature, A Pelicane withouten pride To these lollers laied his lure : fie mused his matter in measure, To oounsale Christ euer gan he call : The GriSbn shewed as sharpe as fyre : But falshed foule mote it befall.

The Pellicane began to preach Both of mercie and of meeknesse : And said that Christ so gan ts teach, And meeke and merciable gan blesse : The Euangely beareth witnesse A lambe he likeneth Christ ouer all, In tokening that he meekest was, Sith pride was out of heauen fall.

And Ysen none earthly honours : Neither crowne, ne curious couetours, Ne pillour, ne other proud pall, Ne nought to cofren yp great treasours.

For falshed foule mote it befall. Priests should for no cattell plede. But chasten hem in charitie : Ne to no battaile should men lede, For inhaunsing of her own degree.

Nat wilne sittings in high see, Ne soueraignty in hous ne hall, All woridly worship defie and flee : For who willeth highnes, foule shall fall.

And maketh them to hem thrall : To Christ I hold such one traitour, As low as Lucifer such one shal fall. That willeth to be kings peeres, And higher than the Emperour : And some that were but poore Freres, Now woUen waxe a warriour.

Gh d is not her gouemour, That holdeth no man his permagall, While couetise is her counsailour, All such, falshed mote need fall.

There is much severe sarcasm in the following stanzas from the second part, describing the unfaithfulness of the priests, and untrue shepherds of Christ's flock.

He culleth the sheepe as doth the Cooke Of hem seeken the wool! God for his mercy them amend. After Christ had take Peter the Kay, Christ said, he must die for man.

But all such God may well amend. For Sathan is to say no more, Biit he that contrary to Christ is, In this they leame Feters lore, They sewen him when he did misse.

They follow Peter forsooth in this, In all that Christ would Peter reprehend. But not in that, that lobgeth to heuen blisse. God for his mercy hem amend.

Christ bad Peter keepe his sheepe, And with his sword forbade him smite : Swerd is no toole with sheepe to keepe.

But to shepheards that sheepe wol bite : Me thinketh such shepheards ben to wite, Ayen her sheepe with swerd that contend, They driue her sheepe with great despite.

But all this God may well amend. So successours to Peter be they nought, Whom Christ made cheefe pastoure, A swerd no shepheard Tsen ought, But he would slea, as a butchoure.

For who so were Peters successoure. Should here his sheepe till his backe bend, And shaddow hem from euery shoure. And all this God may weU amend.

Successours to Peter ben these In that, that Peter Christ forsooke. See also War- ton's Observ.

Poet,, vol. The present fine copy formerly belonged to Narcissus Luttrell and to Mr. Bound in Calf, extra. Chaucee, Geoffrey. Sir Francis Kinaston, the author of this translation, descended from an ancient and knightly family in Shropshire, seated at Oteley, near Ellesmere, was the son of Sir Edward Kinaston, Knight, Sheriff of Shropshire in , and was educated at Oriel College, Oxford, under the celehrated John Rous, the puhlio Lihrarian, where he took the degree of B.

From Ox- ford he went to London and joined the court, where, being esteemed for his learning and other accomplishments, he had the honour of knighthood con- ferred upon him in , and was made esquire of the body to Charles I.

He was at the head of the College of the MussBum Minervse, in London, an academy for the education of the gentry in the fine arts, and drew up the Constitutions of that body, published in , 4to.

Kinas- ton died, according to Wood, in , but we believe his death was not till after The same writer observes that "he was more addicted to the superficial parts of learning, poetry and oratory, wherein he excelled, than logic and philosophy.

Strode, Public Orator; Tho. Lloyd, LL. Johns Coll. Crowther, M. Ibid,; Dudley Digges, Fell. All Souls; T. Gowen, Fell. Kinaston, A. Barker, A.

Foulis, Fell. All Souls; Will. Cartwright; Sam. Evans, LL. Reade, LL. Ibid,; and Francis James, Fell. The English text of the poem, which is printed in tlft, XzXX.

It is in rhyme or metre, and the second book is incribed in Latin to John Rous, the Oxford librarian, his former tutor, to whom he acknowledges his obligations when an academician.

Kinaston intended to have published the other books in the same manner ; and the folio manuscript containing the entire translation, with a commentary and notes on the whole, as prepared for the press, and with a pen and ink portrait of Sir Francis, is now in the possession of the President of the Chetham Society, who purchased it at the sale of Mr.

Singer's manuscripts. The translation is considered to be done with much elegance and spirit, as well as fluency and clearness of style, and is, moreover, remarkable for the fidelity with which the difficult original of Chaucer has been rendered.

Asa pleasing- and somewhat successful speci- men of a curious literary performance, we now present our readers with an extract or two from this translation.

The opening stanzas are thus ren- dered : 1. Dolorem Troili duplicem narrare. My parpose is, er that I part froy. Tisiphone fer opem reoensere Thon Thesiphone, thou helpe me for ten- Hos versus, qui, dum scribo, visi flere.

Me iuuA, qui anm instrumentum maBBtum Thou cruell farie sorowing eaer in paine, AmantOB queri docens his oameenb : Nam oonuenit humentibus et genis Triatem habere tremulum paoorein, Historiam xnsMtam yultuB et msrorem.

Nam ego qui Capidinis semoram Sum seraas, et amare nunquam ausus Pro bono statu oro tamen eonim ; Tarn longd inops tenebris sum clauaus. Nil minus si hoc gaudia aut plausus Amanti ulli feret, yel solameu, Illi sint grates, meum sit grayamen.

Helpe me that am the sorowful instru- ment That helpeth Louers, as I can oomplaine : For well sit the sooth for to saine A wofuU wight to haue a drery feare, And to a sorowfull Tale a sorie cheare.

For I that God of Loues seruants serue, Ne dare to loue for mine unlikeljnesse Prayen for speed all should I therefore sterue So farre am I fro his helpe in derknesse.

But nathelesse, if this may done gladnesse To any Louer, and his cause auaile, Haue he my ihanke, and mine be the tra- uaile. The SoDg of Troilus is Uius neatly translated : Si non sit amor, Dii ; quid est quod sen- tio?

Si bonus sit, Malorum undo inyentio P Si mains sit Portentum non est tale. Quum omnis cruciatus et lethale Yulnus sit gratum ; misera quam conditio Quanto plus bibo, tanto niagis sitio.

If no loye is, O God, what feele I so? And if loye is, What thing, and which is he? If loye be good, from whence commeth my Wo?

If it be wicke, a wonder thinketh me, When euerie torment and aduersite. That commeth of him, may to me saueiy think: For aie thirst I the more that iohe it drinke.

Si ardeo yoluntate non inuitft, Unde hie luctus mens est progressus? Si damnum plaoens, quorsum queror ita F Nescio cur sisto, cum non sim defessus : O dulces lerumnas quas sum perpessus!

Qui fit, me angat dolor tam immensus, Ni priuB datus sit mens assensus? If harme agree me, whereto plaine I thenne?

Hei mihi! Nam sBstuans algeo, algens eestu morior. For heate of cold, for cold of heate I die. One more extract, forming part of the gentle Creseide's meditations in her chamher on her love for Troilus, shall conclude our quotations from the poem.

But right as when the Sunne shiaeth Mutatur sepe, facies formosa. Which ouersprate the Sunne, as for a space, A cloudy thought gan through her soule pace GPhat ouerspredde her bright thoughts all, So that for feare almost she gan to fall.

Hbbc erat : Hei! Annon in aliis possum contemplari Hlomm gaudium payidum, graues curas? Non amat, qui non sentit yices duras. That thought was this, alas!

Ther loueth none, that she ne hath waie to plain. Amorem nam plenissimum nimborum, Molestum yite genus scio fore.

Nam semper aliquid est dissidiorum Et nubes aliquas super Solis ore. Prseterea noe misellffi in dol9re For loue is yet the most stormie life Bight of himselfe, that euer was begonne For euer some nustmst, or nice strife.

Tarn presto sunt et prauie lingus fari Calumnias, viri et sunt fallaoes ita : Vt ppout forma coeperit mutari, Sic amor ; noua arnica est qusssita : Qufficnnq : iniuria facta, non oblita.

Nam quamvis hi se lacerent ob amorem In fine minus sentiunt dolorem. There is no wight tliat mote, I trow so, Where it becometh, to no wight on it spometh That erst was nothing into nought tumeth.

For though there be no cause, yet hem semen, Al be for harme, that folke her firends quemen. And who may stoppen euery wicked tong?

Or soune of belles while that they ben rong. See also Wood's Ath, Oxon. Early Engl. Quamobrcm talis amor sit, tenere Nequeo, nee ubi sit amisaione Nam nemo capit, mefl opinione Quid fit decor ; en prorsus ignoratur Quod fuit nil in nihilum mutatur.

Sed quia rumores reprimat linguarum Aut sonitum pulsarum campanarum. It sold at Sir Mark M. The Poem B to N n 4 in fours. Beautiful Copy.

In Russia, gilt leaves. Chester, Robert. Excellently figured out in a worthy Poem. It was puh- lished hy Chester in , 4to, and the only known copy, which was formerly in the Roxhurghe and Sykes collections, is now in that of Mr.

Miller, at Brit well House. The present appears to he the same volume, with a new title-page only, altered prohahly hy the bookseller to further the sale of the copies on hand ; but the rarity of each is such as to entitle them to be considered as probably unique volumes.

The first poem in the book is entitled " Rosalins Complaint, metaphori- cally applied to Dame Nature at a Parliament held in the high Star-cham- ber by the Gods, for the preseruation and increase of Earths beauteous Phoenix.

With much of the extravagance and conceit so prevalent at that time among poetical writers, derived probably from the Italian poets, on whom they formed their models, Chester's verse is superior to many of the rhyming versifiers of his day, and may be quoted with satisfaction.

His epithets are well chosen, and his language graceful and expressive, as witness the subjoined stanzas. A champion country full of fertill Flaines, Greene grassie Medowes, little prettie Hils, Aboundant pleasure in this place remaines, And plenteous sweetes this heauenly clymat filles : Faire flowing bathes that issue from the rockes, Aboundant heards of beasts that come by flockes.

Fine Thickets and rough Brakes for sport and pleasure, Places to hunt the light-foote nimble Boe : These groues Diana did account her treasure, And in the cold shades, oftentimes did goe To lie her downe, faint, weary on the ground, Whilest that her Nimphs about her daunst a round.

A quire of heauenly Angels tune their voyoes, And counterfeit the Nightingale in singing, At which delight some pleasure she reioyoes.

And Plenty from her cell her gifts is bringing : Peares, Apples, Plums, and the red ripe Cherries, Sweet Strawberries with other daintie berries.

The Orocadile and hissing Adders sting. May not come neere this holy plot of ground. What shal I say? Nature, All haile faire Fhcenix, whither art thou flying?

Why in the hot Sunne dost thou spread thy wings? More pleasure shouldst thou take in cold shades lying. And for to bathe thy selfe in wholesome Springs, Where the woods feathered quier sweetely sings : Thy golden Wings and thy breasts beauteous Eie, Will fall away in Phcebus royaltie.

My in this Chariot, and come sit by me, And we will leaue this ill corrupted Land, We'le take our course through the blew azure skie, And set our feete on Paphos golden sand, There of that Turtle Dave we'le mderstand : And yisite him in those delightfiill plaines, Where Peace conioyn'd with Plenty still remaines.

Looke, Fhcenix, ore the world as thou dost ride, And thou shalt see the pallaoes of Kings, Qreat huge-built Cities where high States abide.

Temples of G-ods, and Altars with rich offiriDgs. To which the Priests their sacrifices brings : Wonders past wonder, strange Pyramides, And the gold-gathering Strond of Suphraies.

PhoBtdx, O what rich pleasure dwelleth in this Land! Greene springing Medowes, high ypreared Hils, The white-fleest Ewe brought tame rnto the hand, Eaire running Biuers that the Countrie fils, Sweet flowers that faire balmy Deaw distils Great peopled Cities, whose earth-gracing show.

Time is asham'd to touch or ouerthrow! Be silent, gentle Phoenix, He repeate Some of these Cities names that we descrie. Alfred buried in the CathedraU Church of Win- chester.

Alfred the father of faire Elfleda, Founded three goodly, famous Monasteries, In this large He of sweete Sritania, For to refresh the poore soules miseries That were afflicted with calamities : One in the Towne sumamed JSdlingsey, Which after ages called Aihelney.

The second House of that Deuotion He did erect at worthy Winchester y A place well planted with Religion, Called in this age the new-builded Minster, Still kept in notable reparation : And in this famous builded Monument, His bodie was interd when life was spent.

Since when with Learnings glorie it is blest, Begun by the godly exhortation Of the Abbot Neotus direction : From whose rich womb pure Angell-like Diuinitie, Hath sprong to sane ys from Calamitie.

Other cities are enumerated, Lejcester, St. At the close of this episode relating to King Arthur, the Dialogue is again resumed between Nature and the Phosnix, with a description of old Troy- novant or London : And to beguile the wearie Ungring Day Whose long'drawne Howers do tire ys out of measure Nature sings the following ditty or loTe-song : What is Loue but a toy To beguile mens Senses?

What is Cupid but a boy, Boy to cause expences, A toy that brings to fooles oppressed thrall A boy whose foUy makes a number fall.

What is Loue but a child, Child of little substance : Making Apes to be wild, And their pride to aduance, A child that loues with guegawes to be toying, And with thinne shadowes alwaies to be playing.

Loue is sweete, wherein sweete? In fading pleasures, wanton toyes, Loue a Lord, and yet meete, To crosse mens humours with annoyes : A bitter pleasure, pleasing for a while, A Lord is Loue that doth mans thoughts beguile.

What greater blisse then to embrace The perfect patteme of Delight, Whose heart-enchaunting Eye doth chase AU stormes of sorow from mans sight : Pleasure, Delight, Wealth, and earth-ioyes do lye In Venus bosome, bosome of pure beautie.

That mind that tasteth perfect Loue, Is farre remoted from annoy : Cupid that Gtod doth sit aboue, That tips his Arrowes all with ioy : And this makes Poets in their Verse to sing Loue is a holy, holy, holy thing.

The Dialogue is thus again continued hj Nature : Nature. O voice Angelicall, O heauenly Song, The golden praise of Loue that thou hast made Deliuer'd firom thy sweete smoothd honied tong, Commannds Loue selfe to lye within a shade, And yeeld thee all the Pleasures may be had : Thy sweete melodious voice hath beautifide And guilded Louee rich kmours in her pride.

Stay Phomix stay, the euening Starre drawes nie, And Phasbus he is parted from our sight, And with his Wagon mounted in the Skie, Affoording passage to the gloomie night, That doth the way-faring Passenger affright : And we are set on foote neere to that He, In whose deepe bottome plaines.

Delight doth smile. Looke round about, behold yon fruitfull Flaine, Behold their meadow plots and pasture ground, Behold their chrjstall Kivers runne amaine.

Into the Taste huge Seas deuouring sound. And while the day giues light Tiito our eies. Be thou attentiue, and I will relate The glorie of the plaines that thou descri'st, Whose fertill bounds farre doth extenuate, Where Mars and Venus arme in arme haue sate : Of plants, of hearbs, and of high springing trees.

Of sweete delicious sauors, and of Bees. The remainder of the "Dialogue" is chiefly occupied with a long and curious list of herbs and plants, fruit and forest trees, fishes, precious stones, minerals, rocks, beasts, worms, insects, and birds ; the virtues and qualities of some of which are treated of in separate stanzas, interspersed with inte- resting classical and legendary allusions, a few of which we should have been glad to have transferred to our pages had our limits allowed it, but we must content ourselves with only the two following : The Nightingale the nights true Chorister, Musickes chiefs louer in the pleasant Spring, Tunes Hunts-yp to the Sunne that doth delight her, And to Arions harp aloud will sing : And as a Bridegroome that to church is comming, So he salutes the Sunne when he is rising.

To play, to dally, and to make them sport, And oftentimes in Oreeke and Latine tong, They taught those birds to sing a pleasant song.

Natare then takes her leave, and the dialogue is concluded between the Phoenix and the Turtle, who throw themselves into the flames, the former exclaiming : Phomix, holy, saored, and pure perfect fire, More pure than that ore which faire Dido mones, More sacred in my loning kind desire, Then that which humt old Esons aged bones, Accept into your euer hallowed flame, Two bodies, firom the which may spring one name.

O sweet perfumed flame, made of those trees, Ynder the which the Muses nine haue song The praise of vertuous maids in mysteries, To whom the faire fac'd Nymphes did often throng, Accept my hody as a Sacrifice Ldto your flame, of whom one name may rise.

And thus I end the Turtle Doues true story. Blaze not my loue, thou Herald of the day, Blesse not the mountaine tops with my sweet shine, Beloued more I am then thou canst say, Blessed and blessed be that Saint of mine, VOL.

Balme, honie sweet, and honor of this Clime : Blotted by things ynfleene, belou'd of manj, But Loues true motion dares not give to any. Vautsqfe to thinke how I do pine In louinff thee that art not mine.

And now first conse- crated by them all generally to the loue and merite of the true-noble Enight, Sir lohn Salisburie.

Dignum laude yirum Musa vetat mori. Splendor I O more then mortall. All Nature of commending. Her wit as quicke, and sprightfuU Alas!

My selfe am so neare drowning? Kor takes she pride to know them. Ben: lohnson. We have already spoken of the extreme rarity of this work, of which, at the time the former portion of this article was written, some years ago, it was believed that the copy in the BiU, Ang, Foet.

Bindley, and disposed of at his sale, was sold at Mr. Daniel's sale in , No. On a careful inspection of Mr. Bindley's sale catalogue, no such work appears in it, and the report was evidently a mistake : it is more pro- bable that the copy came from the same private source from which he pro- cured some of his other great rarities.

It contains 97 leaves, or if the blank Sig. A 1 be reckoned, as it certainly ought to be, 98 leaves. The present copy, the only one known of the reissue with a new title, came from the collection of the Rev.

Henry F. Lyte, No. It is in very fine condition, clean and perfect as when it first came from the press. The contents are exactly the same as in the first issue, with the exception of the omission of the two leaves after the title, containing the dedication and the short address to the reader.

Elegantly bound by Hayday. In Brown Morocco, with gilt gauffered edges. To which is added the true manner of her Emperiall Funerall. Non Verbis sed Virtute.

Printed at London by V. Henry Chettle, originally a printer or compositor, is better known as a prolific playwright, having been concerned, along with Decker, Munday, Haughton, and others, in the composition of nearly forty plays, only four of which, however, have descended to our times.

The present pamphlet is by no means devoid of attraction, and is written partly in prose and partly in verse. The chief subject of Chettle's work is a laudatory discourse or eulogy on the character of Elizabeth, commencing with notices of her grandfather and grandmother, Henry of Lancaster and Elizabeth of York, of her father Henry VIII.

Daniel, the first on the list, is thus noticed as the " sweetest song-man of all," and is followed by Warner : He that so well could sing the fatall strife Betweene the royaU Roses White and Bed, That praised so oft Eliza in her life, His Muse seemes now to die, as sbee is dead.

Thou sweetest song -man of all English swaines Awake for shame, honour ensues thy paines, But thou alone deseru'dst not to be blamde, He that sung fortie yeares her life and birth, And is by English Albions so much famde For sweete mizt layes of maiestie with mirth, Doth of her losse take now but little keepe, Or else I gesse he cannot sing, but weepe.

Of her he seemes to haue no memorie. His Muse another path desires to tread, True Satyres scourge the lining, leaue the dead. There are others hinted at whose names it is more difficult to supply ; among these are "delicious sportive Musidore," " quicke Anti-horace," whom Mr.

The discourse on the cha- racter and virtues of Elizabeth is thus continued by the shepherds in prose, by whom she is thus apostrophized : Sweete Virgin, shee was borne on the Eue of that blessed Virgins Natiuitie, holy Mary, Christs Mother : shee dyed on the Eue of the Annunciation of the same most holy Virgin : a blessed note of her endlesse blessednesse, and her societie in heauen with those wise Virgins, that kept Ojle euer in their Lampes, to awaite the Bride- groome.

Shee came vnto the Crowne after her royall sisters death, like a fresh Spring euen in the beginning of Winter, and brought ys comfort, as the deare Sunne doth to storme-dressed Marriners ; shee left the Crowne likewise in the winter of her Age, and the beginning of our Spring : as if the Buler of heauen had ordained her corona- tion in our sharpest Winter to bring rs happinesse, and yncrowned her in our happi- est Spring, to leaue ts in more felicitie by her Succeeder.

O happie beginning, and more happy ende : which notwithstanding, as naturall sonnes and subiects, let her not goe vnwept for to her graue.

Onely our Hymnes may praise her. O, that such worth should perish! It is pleasingly written, without being very remarkable, and thus calls upon the shepherds to welcome their newly-arrived Mon- arch: O Shepheards sing his welcome with sweete notes, Nymphs, strew his way with Boses Bed and White, Prouide all pastimes that may sense delight.

Now from the Orchades to the Cornish lies, From thenoe to Cambria and the Hyberian shore, The sound of Ciuill warre is heard no more ; Each Countenance is garnished with smiles, All in one hymne with sweet contentment sing The praise and power of lamet their onely King.

Our onely King, one He, one Soueraigne : O long-desired, and perfected good. By him the heate of wrath, and boyling blood. Is mildely quenoht : and Enuie counted yaine, One King, one people, blessed ynitie.

That tiee such mightie Nations to agree. There was a second edition of this work by the same printer, Millington, in , 4to, in which there are a few unimportant additions made, and the errors of the press in the present one corrected.

But Mr. See Colliers Bibliog. It sold in North's sale, pt 3, No. There is a copy in the British Museum. A to G 1 in fours.

In Brown Morocco, gilt leaves. Deuised and published only by Thomas Churchyard Gentilman. And in my secoiide Booke shal be foure Tragedies, ten Tales, the Siege of Saynt Quintaynes, Newhauen, Calleis, and Gtynes ; and I hope the rest of all the forrein Warres, that I haue seene or heard of abroade, shal follow in an- other Volume.

The description of this work in Herbert's Ames and copied by Dibdin is yery meagre and imperfect, omitting all mention of the dedication and the verses following.

Heber's Library. The title is within the compartment so frequently used by Marsh with a terminus on each side, the Stationers' arms at the top, and the initials " T.

On the reverse of the title are " The Contents of this Booke. Wherefor I prepared a title aunswer- able to the weight of the worke, misdoubting not but that you will of cortesie behold what blaes of good wyll these my Chips will utter to the worlde.

Assuring myselfe and my friendes, that herein is no kinde of sparke neither hurtfull nor uncomly. But as the world may iudge, among many chips may be sondrie woodes, so the worst of them all makes but a crack, consumes with the coales, and tumeth unto sinders.

The dedication is succeeded by some verses " To the dispisers of other mens workes that shoes nothing of their owne " which conclude with these lines in reference to the whimsical title of his book, and which also exhibit the conceited mode of spelling which he adopted in some of his writings.

What needs more words to waest my wind about these busie brains : That powlts and swels at others toils, and take themselues no pains.

The best is though small goodnes be in these baer chipps of mien ; My hatchet hew'd them all in deede, whear they be grosse or fien. And when that theas haue maed a blaes, and bin in world a whiel : A bigger basket will I bring, to make you worldlings smiel.

And wheaiher theaa you like or noe, the rest are neer the stamp, Which if you pleas to flinge in fier will bume as deer as lamp.

Thus faerwell frends or flyring foes, I kno not how to fawne : I mean to see you ons again, so leue my looke for pawne. The following are the titles of the different pieces in this yolume : 1.

Park was in error in supposing see Cens. Liter, vol. He was early trained to the pursuit of arms, and having acted first under Sir William Drury in Scotland, he went abroad, and served under various other commanders whom he names.

He was more than once taken prisoner, and met with many hardships and vicissitudes, rather than with wealth or fame, as appears from his own verses.

In Scotland long, I lingred out my yeers When Wylford lyy'd, a worthy wight indeed And thear at length, I fell so far re in breara 1 taken was, as deastny had decreed Well yet with woords, I did my foes so feed That thear I lyud, in pleasuer many a daye And skaept so free, and did no randsom paye.

From thens I cam to England as I might And after that, to Irlande did I sayll Whear SeUenger, a wyes and noble knight Gane me such place, as was to myen aduayll Than teasters walkt, as thick as doth the haill About the world : For loe from thence I boer For seruice doen, of money right good stoer.

For I was clapt in pryson without cawse And straightly held, for comming out of Fraunce But G-od did work, throwe iustice of the lawse And help of frindes to me a better chaunce And still I hoept the warres wold me aduaunce So trayld the piek, and world began a nue And loekt like hawk, that laetly cam from mue.

Three yeer at least, I saw the Emprours warres Than hoemward drue, as was my wonted traed Whear Sunne and Moen, and all the seuen Starres Stoed on my syed, and me great welcom maed But wether fayre, and flowrs fiill soen will faed So peoples loue, is like nue besoms oft That sweeps all dean, whyels broem is green and soft.

Well oens again, to warrs I drue me fast And with Lord Qrejf at Qieru I did remayn Where he or his, in any semes past I followed on, among the warlyk trayn And sometime felt, my part of woo and payn As others did, that Cannon well could like And pleasuer took, in trayling of the pike.

At length the French, did Qiens besiege ye wot And littell help, or succour found we tho By whiche fowU want, it was my heauy lot To Parris streight, with good Lord Qrey to goe As prisners boeth, tho world to well doth knoe By tract of tyme, and wonders charge in deed He hoemward went, and took his leue with speed.

But his rambling propensities would not let him remain long at home, and he says with truth, - My mind could neuer rest at hoem My shiies were maed, of running leather sner And boem I was, about the world to roem To see the warres, and keep my hand in ure.

So after serving under Lord Grey at the siege of Leith, and resting himself a little while at Court, he went abroad again to Antwerp, and had some further adventures and hair-breadth escapes both there and in France and Flanders, but related at too great length to be inserted here.

It is not our intention to insist much upon the merits of Churchyard as a poet ; but surely he who wrote the Legend of Shore's Wife was something more than a mere rhymster.

Whatever his merits were in writing, he was beholden for them to the Earl of Surrey, as he himself acknowledges, in whose family he had been trained, and to whom he was personally in- debted for his first instruction in poetic composition.

It was Churchyard's fate, whether at home or abroad, in peace or war, to be nearly always in a state of poverty, which urged him to write, like some others of his time, too much on the spur of the moment, and often very indifferently.

But there is a simplicity and straightforwardness, a truth and good sense in some of his writings, which are quite refreshing ; and although deficient in in- vention, render them deserving of notice.

Witness the following remarks for instance, on the fickleness and uncertainty of some of his Court friends towards him.

A littell breath I toek than after this And shaept my self, about the Court to be And eury day, as right and reason is To serue the Prince, in Court I feUled me Some frends I found, as frends do go you se That gaue me wordes, as sweet as hony still Yet let me lyue, by hed and conning skill.

I croetcht, I kneeld, and many a oap oould yajU And watched laet, and early roes at moem And with the throng, I follouwd hard at tayll As braue as bull, or sheep but nuely shoem The gladdest man that euer yet was boem To wayt and staer, among the staets full hye Who feeds the poer, with many firendly eye.

But who can Hue, with goodly lookes aloen Or miny wordes, that sounds like tabrers pyep Say what they will, they loue to keep their own And part with nought, that commeth in their griep Tou shall haue nuts, they say when ploms aer riep Thus all with shalis, or shaels ye shall be fed And gaep for gold, and want both gold and led.

No matter now though ech man march and tread On him that hates the life he beores about Yet such as shall, these heauy Verses read Shall finde I blame my fortune out of dout But sens [since] on hope, no better hap will sprout I yeild to death, and upward lift the minde Where lothsome life, shall present comfort finde.

Sens hope can haue no hony from the Hiue And paines can plucke, no pleasure for his toile It is but Taine, for weery life to striue And streatch out time, with torment and tormoile Get what we can, death triumphes oer the spoile Than note this well, though we win neer so mitch When death taeks al, we leaue a mizer ritch.

Hie time it is, to haest my carkas hens Youth stole awaye, and felt no kinde of ioye And age he laft in trauel euer sens The wanton days that made me orice and coye Wear but a dreame, a shadoe and a toye Sith slanrye heer I finde and nothing els My hoem is thear, wher soule in freedome dwels.

The lipps were cold, and locks both pad and thin The teeth fawlls out, as nutts forsoek the shaell The baer bald head but shoes whaer hear hath bin The liuoly ioynts waxe weery stiffe and staell The reddy tongue now folters in his taell The wearishe face, and tawny coUour shoes The corraeg quaiUs, as strength decayes and goes.

The sweet dalites are dround in dulled minde The gladsome sports, to groning sighes are bent The frisking lims, so farre from frame I finde That I forethincke the time that youth hath spent But when I way, that all these things wear lent And I must pay the earth her dutie throw I shrincke no wit, to yeld these pleasures now.

And had in store to make my frendes good cheer Sutch commo things, as neighbours haue at call Li snch dispayre, percbaunoe I would not fall But want of thift, and other laokes a skore Bids me seeko death, and wishe to Hue no more.

Yet for to beare a peeoe of all my woes And to impart, the priuie pangs I felt From countrie soile, a sober wife I choes In mine owna house, with whom I seldom dwelt When thousandes slepte, t waekt, I swet I swelt To compas that, I neuer could attaine And still from hoem, abroed I braek my braine.

The thatcher hath a cottage poore you see The sheppard knoes, where he shal sleepe at night The daily drudge, from cares can quiet bee Thus Fortune sends some rest to eurye wight So borne I was, to house and lande by right But in a bagg, to Court I brought the same From Shrewsbrye towne, a seat of auncient fame What thinke my frindes, that thear behind I laft What faidt finds she, that gaue me lief and suck courting fien[d], thou art to cold a crafb The Carter haeth at hoem much better luck.

Well, well I saye, adue all worldly muck Ne howse nor land we bear away I knee 1 naked cam, and naked hence must goe. The greatest Kyng must pas the self saem way Our day of byrth, and buriall are alike Their ioy, their pompe, their wealth and riohe araye Shall soen consume, like snew that lies in dieck No buoklar serues, when sodayn death doth striek Ab soem may coem a poer mans soule to blys As may the rich, or greatest Lord that is.

Well, ear may breath, my body doe forsaek My spreet I doe bequeath to Ood aboue My bookes, my skrowls, and songs that I did maek I leaue with frindes, that fireely did me loue To flyring foes, whoes malice did me moue I wyshe in haest, amendment of their wayes And to the Court, and oourtiars happy dayes.

The last piece. Collier, in his recent Bibliogr. Heber had a large and valuable collection of Churchyard's pieces, uniformly bound, including those on the controversy, which are noticed with some interesting remarks by him in the fourth part of his Catalogue, A long list of his pieces with a biographical notice of Churchyard will be found in Dr.

Bliss's Edit, of Wood's Ath, Oxon. This list has been increased by Mr. Hazlitt in his " Hand-Book of Popular Literature," vol. Comp, vol.

PoeLy p. It is evident that besides the two leaves declared to be wanting in the copy in the latter Cat. The Heber copy. In Green Morocco, with broad border of gold, gilt leaves.

Deuised and published onlye by Thomas Churchyard Gentleman. Cum priuilegio. Ad other edition of the same work, which does not vary excepting as to typography from the preceding impression of , the contents of both being exactly the same.

As a proof of the rarity of the work, it may only be ne- cessary to state, that so far back as Dr. It was sold at Hibbert's sale, No.

Collation : Title and Introduction, four leaves ; Sig. The Utterson capy. Descrip- tion, of the wofull warres in Flaunders, since the foure last yeares of the Emperor Charles the fifth his raigne.

With a briefe rehearsall of many things done since that season, vntill this present yeare, and death of Don John.

Written by Thomas Churchyarde Gentleman. Imprinted at London by Ralph Newberie. The dedication is followed by a metrical sort of preface entitled " Flaunders bewayles with bitter sorrow, the soare affliction of hir state and Countrey.

And bj cause the Prince hadde made of mee before, and that thej knew I hadde serued in the Empe- roures dayes they called me forth, and saide I shoulde be theyr leader, whiche thinge I refused as far as I durst, alleadging, I was ignoraunt of suche affayres : whereupon, they bent theyr pikes on me in a greate furie.

I beholding the extreamitie I was in, gaue them my faith, and so came into the streete among the reste of their companye, where I was so receiued, as fewe woulde haue beleeued the manner thereof, but suche as had seene it.

Thou shalt haue mates to folloTT thee and help thee if thou fall. I haue Tvide scope at yyill to walke, yea Peune and Muse at call.

And other Bookes that I must needes committe to Worldes report. He is thrioe hlest that Trell doth rrorke, our time is heere hut short.

This work is not without a certain intrinsic value from the circumstance of Churchyard having been himself a pereonal witness of much that he de- scribes, and taken an active and important part in these wars, leading at one time, as he records, so large a body as SOOO men to an attack upon the enemy.

It is not so rare as some of his productions, but sold at Reed's sale, No. Heber's ditto, pt. PoeU No. A to K 2, in fours.

A thousand gentle mennes names, of the best sort of warriours. A praise and true honour of Soldiours : A proofe of perfite Nobilitie.

A triall and first erection of Heraldes : A discourse of calamitie. And ioyued to the same some Tragedies and Epitaphes, as many as was necessarie for this firste booke.

All whiche workes are dedicated to the right honourable Sir Christopher Hatton knight, vize Chamberlain, Capitain of the gard ; and one of the Queenes maiesties priuie counsail.

Written by Thomas Churchyard Gentleman. And in the rather lengthy " Epistle Dedicatorie ' to Sir Christopher Hatton knight, Vize Chamberlaine to the Queenes maiestie, and one of her highnesse priuie Counsaill, he thus alludes to this circumstance : I promiBed says he in the booke of my Chippt a matter rnfit for your honour to looke on to presente another worke, whiche hath been long of commyng out, and I feare is ouer simple with all this greate laisure, to merite thankes.

Notwithstand- yng the paines hath been greate, and desire to dooe well not little : yet the barenesae of the woordes and weaknesse of the matter, I dread will either lose my thankes, or driue me in disgrace.

And yet I might saie that the matter nowe presented, though not well written maie claim a greate consideration, and merites as mutche fauour, as any thyng that euer passed from my pecoe.

No nest' 4isla oxotnikam v nem kopat'sa, proseivaa pustuu porodu i vicejivaa brilliantiki. Ix vnimanie preobrazuetsa v sootvetstvuu6ie reklamnie doxodi.

Vebdvanolevskaa sxema zarabotala blagodara mizernim izderjkam xranenia i pereda4e informacii v internete. Eto mojet okazat'sa porazitel'no produktivnim, kak, naprimer, v ob6estvennoy enciklopedii Vikipedii, nad popolneniem kotoroy bok o bok trudatsa znatok, doskonal'no vladeu6iy predmetom, i 4elovek, popraviv6iy gde-to zapatuu.

Po krayney mere koli4estvo obnarujennix o6ibok i v toy, i v drugoy sravnimo. Kogda ob etoy iniciative zagovorili, a v nee ne veril, s4itaa, 4to iz sobak ne slepi6' odnogo l'va.

Okazivaetsa, kakie-to ne stol' slojnie po ustroystvu ve6i mojno sozdat' brigadnim metodom. V bol'6om iskusstve takim sposobom mojno viyti razve 4to na uroven' kapustnika.

No est' slu4ai, kogda kontent, sozdanniy prostimi pol'zovatelami, visoko konkurenten po sravneniu s professional'nim.

V 4astnosti, segodna kajdiy obladatel' sotovogo telefona sam sebe fotodokumentalist. Nikakix budjetov ne napase6'sa, 4tobi nanat' korrespondentov i usledit' za vsemi interesnimi sobitiami v mire.

A dobrovol'ci voley obstoatel'stv stanovatsa o4evidcami, oni vsegda na4eku, i ot nix ni4ego ne uskol'zaet — ni sxod lavini, ni buystva jivotnix, ni dorojnoe prois6estvie, ni kazn' diktatora.

I bezostanovo4no, daje bessovestno! Obrazuutsa gigantskie terrikoni kontenta. Kak nayti to, 4to deystvitel'no interesuet? Skol'ko nujno posmotret' rolikov, 4tobi natknut'sa na xoro6iy, skol'ko probejat' glazami anekdotov, 4tobi rassmeat'sa?

Ranee opredelenniy uroven' ka4estva garantirovala professional'naa instancia — institut kritiki. Ona otbirala tex, komu delegirovano pravo golosa, i opredelala, u kogo etot golos v ob6em i celom professional'no postavlen.

Eto odna texnologia: sna4ala kontent selekcioniruetsa, potom publikuetsa. Esli zaxo4e6', mgnovenno oti6e6' videorolik, kotoriy ponravilsa millionu uzerov.

Tol'ko vot nado li tebe ego smotret'? Eto i est' Web 2. Imxonet — eto Web 3. On nadelaet pol'zovatela bolee visokim statusom, predlagaet inuu rabotu i inoe voznagrajdenie.

On podnimaet kollektivnuu potrebitel'skuu ekspertizu na radikal'no inoy uroven', nejeli primitivnie reytingi.

Segodna v blogovom prostranstve mojno orientirovat'sa po reytingam, dostoinstva i nedostatki kotorix izu4eni vdol' i poperek. No v bol'6instve svoem visokoreytingovaa kul'turnaa poxlebka banal'na — prosto v silu togo, 4to ona pri6las' po vkusu millionam.

Ona ne vpe4atlaet, kak ne sme6it samiy popularniy v mire anekdot. Bilo takoe special'noe issledovanie, v kotorom u4astvovali bolee tisa4 4elovek.

A kakim, spra6ivaetsa, on doljen bit', 4tobi ego ponali ot mala do velika vo vsex ugolkax mira?! Imxonet — eto v nekotorom smisle antireyting.

On ni4ego ne usrednaet, nikogo skopom ni s kem ne summiruet. Imxonet avtomati4eski otbiraet ludey odnogo kruga i obespe4ivaet kommunikaciu mejdu vkusovimi edinomi6lennikami.

Etot princip nazivaetsa kollaborativnoy fil'traciey ot angl. Ludi viskazivaut svoi sujdenia po povodu ka4estva tex ili inix produktov i uslug v 4astnosti, proizvedeniy iskusstva v vide ocenok.

U kajdogo 4eloveka obrazuetsa nabor takix ocenok, na osnove kotorix programma stroit ego profil' predpo4teniy. Eto mogut bit' ocenki knijek, kinofil'mov, oteley, restoranov, daje kosmeti4eskix salonov, kritikov, jurnalistov.

Etot princip intuitivno ponaten i zdrav. Esli iz neskol'kix soten pro4itannix za jizn' knijek odin 4elovek sovpal s drugim v neskol'kix desatkax naimenovaniy — eto, nesomnenno, svidetel'stvuet ob ix ob6nosti.

A esli k tomu je oni odinakovo k nim otneslis', to s bol'6oy veroatnost'u i novoe proizvedenie oni rascenat sxodnim obrazom. Togda perviy, kto znakomitsa s novinkoy, vistupaet dla partnera nadejnim rekomendatelem.

Eto i est' princip kollaborativnoy fil'tracii, leja6iy v osnove na6ego rekomendatel'nogo servisa.

Imxonet — eto ne reyting, a personalizirovannaa viborka nailu46ix dla kajdogo 4eloveka podskaz4ikov i podskazok, kotoraa generiruetsa avtomati4eski.

Sistema pozvolaet na poradok snijat' trudoemkost' poiska interesnix i vajnix ve6ey v 4astnosti, proizvedeniy iskusstva i povi6at' to4nost' vibora.

Net nikakoy opasnosti okuklivania v soob6estve, poskol'ku krugi edinomi6lennikov ves'ma podvijni, ix granici pronicaemi i razomknuti.

Oni ne na zamke. Rezul'tatom serfinga vnutri Imxoneta avlaetsa nabor proizvedeniy, kotorimi ti zainteresovalsa i otlojil sebe na knijnuu polku.

Po moey praktike eta viborka obrazuetsa o4en' raznimi putami. Bazoviy — avtomati4eskie rekomendacii samogo servisa. No est' i drugie sposobi. Togda on avtomati4eski popadet na personal'nuu knijnuu polku, gde budet dojidat'sa svoego 4asa.

A vot e6e sposob vixoda iz germeti4noy, kak vi opasaetes', gruppi takix mar6rutov v principe ne odin i ne dva. Eti troe vovse ne obazatel'no opredelautsa sistemoy kak moi rekomendateli, na6i vkusi mogut v ostal'nom ne sovpadat'.

V oblasti non-fik6n mi kogerentni, a vne ee — po xudojestvennoy literature ili po kino — net. Servis pozvolaet eto sdelat'. Znakovie proizvedenia bivaut kak minimum dvux tipov.

Perviy — redkaa, slojnaa ve6', videlit' kotoruu sposobni tol'ko neslu4aynie ludi. Vtoroy — o4en' popularnoe proizvedenie, xit sezona, kotoroe vi vmeste s kem-to otrinuli.

Eto zna4imo i znakovo. Privedennie primeri — eto varianti tonkoy raboti s edinomi6lennikami, kotorix v Imxonete bezdna. Sistema ved' vizualiziruet profili u4astnikov razumeetsa, s ix soglasia i predlagaet massu rakursov, pod kotorimi mojno na eti vkusovie otpe4atki vzglanut'.

Vot e6e mexanizm vixoda za predeli svoego pul'siruu6ego kruga. Polojim, nekto vi4islen kak tvoy edinomi6lennik na tom osnovanii, 4to vi oba — fanati fantastiki.

No ti poglo6ae6' tol'ko fantastiku, a on e6e smotrit artxausnoe kino. V ob6em, ludi ne kloni, oni dovol'no sil'no razli4autsa po kul'turno-potrebitel'skim profilam.

Pri tom 4to srednee koli4estvo ocenok okolo dla kajdogo segmenta kul'turi , 4islo sovpadeniy s edinomi6lennikami — Vovse daje naoborot.

Pri etom celaa sistema fil'trov po janram, po godam, po banal'nosti… pozvolaet sfokusirovat' svoy interes. Naprimer, mena interesuut knigi, vipu6ennie ne ranee goda.

Ili a ne interesuus' mistikoy i trillerami. S pomo6'u fil'trov legko izbejat' nenujnix rekomendaciy. Osobaa stat'a — banal'nie rekomendacii — odin iz tajelix grexov rekomendatel'nix sistem tipa toy, 4to ispol'zuetsa krupney6im internet-torgovcem Amazon.

Ti, v ob6em, ni4ego protiv titanov ne imee6', no ot podobnix podskazok predpo4el bi uklonit'sa. Dla etogo na Imxonete ispol'zuetsa celiy rad uxi6reniy.

Vtoroy sposob uyti ot banal'nix rekomendaciy — aktivirovat' fil'tr po koli4estvu ocenok v sisteme. Eto izbavlaet ot proizvedeniy, kotorie ocenili tisa4i respondentov i kotorie tebe navernaka izvestni.

Tak 4to ne nujno vosprinimat' Imxonet kak mexanisti4nuu, bezdu6nuu, determinirovannuu ma6inu, formuu6uu bednogo 4eloveka, budto on kirpi4 na konveyere.

Est' mnogo privxoda6ix obstoatel'stv i nesovpadeniy — eto nepaxanoe pole dla raboti li4nosti. U kakogo-to proizvedenia mojet bit' million ocenok, no do tvoego svedenia budut dovedeni ocenki tex 15 4elovek, 4'e mnenie dla teba aktual'no.

A ostal'nix tisa4 s xvostikom… dla teba v dannom sreze kak bi ne su6estvuet. Sujdenia raznix ludey mirno sosu6estvuut v raznix podprostranstvax vkusa.

Eto, kstati, o4en' vajno dla za6iti ot nakru4ivania reytingov, ot semanti4eskogo xakerstva. Oni vse uydut mimo celi, potomu 4to, prosto dolba v odnu vajnuu dla nego to4ku, zloumi6lennik ne sovpadet ni s kem po profilu i sootvetstvenno ne stanet ni4'im rekomendatelem.

A sproektirovat' celiy profil'-fantom — eto slojnoe i ekonomi4eski ne opravdannoe zanatie. Kak sootnositsa rekomendatel'niy servis i blogosfera?

Mojet bit', vse eto — slegka strukturirovannaa blogerskaa sreda? Predstav'te dva bra4nix agentstva, odno iz kotorix znakomit ludey, isxoda isklu4itel'no iz ix podxoda6ego rosta, a drugoe svodit voedino mnogo4islennie sociodemografi4eskie i sociokul'turnie dannie.

Imxonet, kone4no, ne svaxa po pravde, kone4no, svaxa, tol'ko v visokom smisle — imea v vidu rosko6' 4elove4eskogo ob6enia , no vvesti 4eloveka v krug interesnix emu ludey — odna iz vajnix sostavlau6ix missii proekta.

Blogosfera nacelena na poisk edinomi6lennikov, no kak je medlenno tam vse proisxodit! Dopustim, ti — tennisist i vxodi6' v 4at s tennisnoy tematikoy, ob6ae6'sa s edinomi6lennikami na etoy po4ve.

Dla polnocennoy kommunikacii etogo pla4evno malo. Blogosfera — eto glavnim obrazom tekstovaa kommunikacia. Nujno vrema, 4tobi na4itat' kakoe-to koli4estvo viskazivaniy i ocenit' ix.

Do opredelennogo momenta eto nebezinteresno, no vskore nadoedaet iz-za visokoy trudoemkosti i nizkogo vixoda godnogo. Na svete net ni4ego pokazatel'nee, 4em vkusovie predpo4tenia.

Mejdu individami protagivaetsa setka, sostoa6aa iz vajnix uzlov — zna4imix dla nix proizvedeniy. Kstati, tonkiy vopros: naskol'ko nujno sovpadat', 4tobi okazat'sa interesnimi drug drugu?

Vopros optimuma vzaimnogo sovpadenia i dopolnenia. Naydetsa li, 4em obmenivat'sa drug s drugom? Ved' est' predel, za kotorim uravnenie virojdaetsa v tojdestvo.

Togda vam, podobno mnogoletnim suprugam, dela6im loje, uje ne4ego otkrit' drug drugu. V 4em izuminka Imxoneta na programmnom urovne, na ideologi4eskom?

S to4ki zrenia texnologii, eto sistemi ogromnoy vi4islitel'noy slojnosti, kotorie trebuut sootvetstvuu6ego urovna razvitia kak interneta, tak i EVM.

Imxonet sproektirovan pod million pol'zovateley v den', desat' millionov pol'zovateley tol'ko v runete — eto ozna4aet milliardi ocenok i nesmetnoe koli4estvo zaprosov.

I sistema doljna operirovat' takimi bazami dannix! Eto stalo vozmojno sovsem nedavno. Social'naa predposilka takova. No dal'6e proizo6la odna tipi4naa 6tuka: izobretenie obognalo spros na nego.

Okazalos', 4to eti sistemi mogut normal'no su6estvovat', kogda razvita internet-torgovla, a etogo togda ne bilo.

Kino 4to.K - Corona: Gerade jetzt finanziell die Branche unterstützen bevor sie brachliegt

Das Recht auf Privatkopie wird in Österreich eingeschränkt. Auch Isoplex ist kein Streaming, sondern ein Bittorrent -Angebot. IT-Karriere: Services:. June at Oh mein gott, jetzt wurde kino. Vodafone könne nach geltendem Recht nicht verpflichtet werden, Urheberrechtsverletzungen im Internet durch Sperren einzudämmen. Das Recht auf Privatkopie Kino 4to.K in Paul Sparks eingeschränkt. Stephen King Schlafwandler hier um aktuelle News Meldungen ein- bzw. Bislang wurden Nutzer für das Streamen von Residue und Serien noch nicht bestraft, sondern lediglich die Betreiber solcher Portale. November at Also leute ich weis zwar nicht wieso immer wieder solche sachen auf solche seiten wegen kino. June at […] Pottpost ist auch geil, kino. Alle seiten enthalten Viren Ads und Fakes aber keine spielt wirklich Videos ab. December at danke für den link xou… kinokiste. Die Seite gibt es fast genausolange wie kino.

Kino 4to.K Top Trailer der Woche

Dass das ganze nicht ganz legal sein […]. Ein Wahrer Freund Services:. November at Danke für die Übersicht! Smuggling Hendrix. Doch der Streit geht Black Manta weiter. Streaming-Seiten wie Movie4k zu Gohan, ist verlockend. Ihr sucht nach einer Alternative zu Kino.

Kino 4to.K คำที่ถูกค้นหาบ่อยที่สุด Video

Fast and Furious (1-8) Cast Then And Now 2018

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